Driver at home in bed, court told

A JURY will continue to hear evidence today in the trial of a driver accused of killing an Ipswich father on New Year's day.Martin Law, 22, told police he was at home in bed at the time of the accident in which 28-year-old Wayne Goode died, Ipswich Crown Court was told yesterday .

A JURY will continue to hear evidence today in the trial of a driver accused of killing an Ipswich father on New Year's day.

Martin Law, 22, told police he was at home in bed at the time of the accident in which 28-year-old Wayne Goode died, Ipswich Crown Court was told yesterday .

However, CCTV footage recorded at a garage in Sudbury showed a green transit van stopping on the forecourt and Law going in and buying a sandwich minutes before the accident on the A134 near Sudbury, alleged Christopher Morgan, prosecuting.

Law, of Sandpiper Close, Haverhill, has pleaded not guilty to causing the death of Mr Goode of Broomhill Road, Ipswich, by dangerous driving in the early hours of New Year's day.

The court heard that Mr Goode had spent New Year's Eve with his partner and two friends at the Saracen's Head Pub in Newton Green and had drunk a quantity of red wine.

In the early hours of New Year's day he had left the pub alone with the apparent intention of walking back to Ipswich, said Mr Morgan.

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He was seen walking along the A134 by several motorists at about 2.35am. He was wearing a dark coloured suit and was walking along the side of the road as there was no footpath on that particular stretch of road, said Mr Morgan.

Mr Goode's body was found at 2.41am and he was declared dead shortly after the arrival of the emergency services. A post mortem examination showed that he died of multiple injuries.

Mr Morgan said the driver of the vehicle that hit Mr Goode did not stop after the accident. He said it was clear from Mr Goode's injuries that he was hit by more than a glancing blow and that the driver must have realised that he had been involved in a collision.

Debris found at the scene, including a wing mirror and an indicator lamp, led the police to a green Ford Transit van owned for a short period by a man called David Silley, who lives near Law on the Bird's Estate in Haverhill.

Mr Morgan alleged the Transit van had been given to Law by Mr Silley on December 30, 2002 in exchange for some PlayStation equipment.

He said that in the days after the accident in which Mr Goode died the van was seen parked on the Birds Estate.

"On each occasion it was seen after January 1 it was parked in such a way that the near side of the vehicle was obscured from view."

Mr Morgan claimed it was parked in that way by Law to hide "obvious damage" that had resulted from the accident.

On January 5, the van was destroyed by a fire. Mr Morgan said the jury would have to ask whether the fire was started by youths as claimed by Law or if the defendant had deliberately set fire to it to conceal evidence of the accident.

After his arrest in Colchester on January 20, the keys to the van were found in Law's possessions.

However, he told police he had never sat in the van or driven it and that he had been at home in bed at the time of the accident after spending the evening drinking at the homes of friends.

He claimed to have been in bed by 1.00am and said that due to the amount of alcohol he had consumed his recollection of the night was "patchy".

Mr Morgan said that if Law had driven the van after drinking the amount of alcohol he claimed to have drunk, his ability to drive safely would have been seriously affected.

He said that a back calculation worked out by an expert from the amount Law said he had drunk showed he would have been almost twice the legal limit for drinking and driving.

Giving evidence yesterday, Mr Silley said he had sold the green Transit van to Law on December 30.

He denied a suggestion from defence counsel Roger Harrison that although a deal had been discussed between him and Law it had never taken place.

The trial continues today .

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