Drug dealer says Bye Bye to boat

TRIMLEY St Mary drug dealer Edwin Almond today finds himself saying farewell to his £300,000 home and his boat £40,000 Bye Bye.The 33-year-old used to lived in Great Street Farmhouse, drive a number of luxury cars and portray himself as a respectable businessman.

TRIMLEY St Mary drug dealer Edwin Almond today finds himself saying farewell to his £300,000 home and his boat £40,000 Bye Bye.

The 33-year-old used to lived in Great Street Farmhouse, drive a number of luxury cars and portray himself as a respectable businessman.

But he was jailed after he previously admitted possessing £17,850 worth of ecstasy tablets with the intent to supply and to dishonestly receiving a £20,000 V registration Lotus Elise, a £20,000 T reg Jaguar XJR car and a £7,000 Y registration Ducati 748 motorcycle.

It is known that the stolen Jaguar had belonged to Paul Hardcastle, the 1980s pop star who reached the number one slot with his Vietnam War song, 19.

But the final nail in the coffin for Almond's once lavish lifestyle came when he appeared before Ipswich Crown Court on Friday.

Prosecutor Rupert Overbury made an application to confiscate Almond's realisable property under the Proceeds of Crime Act.

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Almond did not contest the application.

Mr Overbury told Ipswich Crown Court that Almond had had a criminal lifestyle – and that he had benefited to the sum of more than £620,000.

Mr Overbury said Almond had realisable property – i.e. assets they could get money from – to the value of £358,322.86

His house, valued at £300,000, is being sold and the outstanding mortgage of £244,865.44 being paid to the Halifax Building Society.

His boat has already been sold and the £20,000 loan taken out from Lombard Marine repaid.

The money Almond is expected to have left – which is more than £50,000 – will be confiscated by the court.

Judge Peter Thompson said: "On the basis of the submissions made, I find that the defendant has a criminal lifestyle and that he has benefited from his criminal conduct.

"I make a confiscation order for £58,344.58."

Almond has to pay this money within 6 months, otherwise he could face a further two years in prison.

The father-of-two is already serving four years for possession with intent to supply on July 31 last year and 18 months for dishonestly receiving goods.

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