Drum and Monkey manager fined for allowing smoking in Ipswich pub

The Drum and Monkey pub in Princes Street.

The Drum and Monkey pub in Princes Street. - Credit: Archant

The manager of one of Ipswich’s best-known pubs has been ordered to pay a total of £800 after being found smoking in the bar – and allowing his customers to smoke on the premises.

Drum and Monkey manager Robert Williams.

Drum and Monkey manager Robert Williams.

Robert Williams, of the Drum and Monkey in Princes Street, pleaded guilty to three breaches of the Health Act 2006 when his case was heard at South East Suffolk magistrates yesterday.

He was charged with three offences:

On 14 July 2015 he smoked a cigarette in a designated smoke free place. He was fined £60.

On 14 July 2015 he failed to stop a person smoking in the pub. He was fined £400.


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And on 17 September 2015 he failed to display “No Smoking” signs. He was fined £150.

He was also ordered to pay £150 costs and a £40 victim surcharge.

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The court was told that, as part of an unrelated investigation, police saw CCTV evidence of Williams and others smoking at the pub outside normal opening hours – and passed on the evidence to Ipswich Council whose environmental health department is responsible for enforcing the smoking ban.

When Williams was interviewed he admitted to both smoking and permitting others to smoke inside the premises, despite being aware that it is illegal to do so.

In the interview he contested the allegation that “No Smoking” signs were not on display when the premises were visited environmental health officers.

Williams offered to pay the fines and costs in full yesterday and was given a formal seven days to make the payment.

The freehold of the Drum and Monkey pub is owned by the borough council and it is in the heart of what is seen as the town’s new commercial area.

It is currently a popular venue for pool and snooker players – and for football supporters on their way to matches at nearby Portman Road.

Williams was not available to make a comment after the court case.

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