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General election 2017: Why did Ben Gummer lose the Ipswich seat?

PUBLISHED: 14:27 09 June 2017 | UPDATED: 08:36 10 June 2017

Ben Gummer looks on as Labour's Sandy Martin is announced as the newly elected MP for Ipswich. 
Picture: ASHLEY PICKERING

Ben Gummer looks on as Labour's Sandy Martin is announced as the newly elected MP for Ipswich. Picture: ASHLEY PICKERING

Copyright Ashley Pickering

Just 48 hours ago he was one of the most powerful men in the British government. Now Ben Gummer's parliamentary career has come to an abrupt end - whether temporarily or permanently. Why did he lose?

During the campaign Ben Gummer always seemed supremely confident, talking confidently about Labour voters switching to him because they didn’t like Jeremy Corbyn. If this was all spin then he and his team were acting very well when they spoke to me!

• Conservative Ben Gummer loses Ipswich seat to Labour’s Sandy Martin.

Even after our survey suggested Sandy Martin was in the lead, they insisted all was well – but clearly things were not going as well as he hoped. Why?

Firstly many people voted for the first time. Turnout was significantly up and many of these appeared to be young people.

They were motivated to vote Labour because they liked Jeremy Corbyn’s radical plans, especially abolishing university tuition fees, and were determined to make their voice heard.

The number of people voting Conservative in Ipswich actually went up between 2015 and 2017 by about 1,600 – but Labour’s vote increased by more than 6,000 votes. The UKIP vote fell by 4,000 – but these votes appear to have been split evenly.

Some policies were not popular: workers said the confusion and mixed messages over pension reform and social care payments had worried some voters.

The lack of attention from big-name visitors also gave the impression that Tory High Command took Ipswich for granted. They seemed to think that a Cabinet minister with a 3,733 majority couldn’t need help.

Some voters appeared to feel that Mr Gummer’s focus was no longer on the town with his new ministerial role – and the fact that he did not have a home in Ipswich at the time of the election did not help.

Given his work in the town, this was probably unfair – but it created an impression his opponents could exploit by emphasising that Mr Martin had lived in Ipswich for decades.

And a number of small policy statements caused real problems – one of the most irritating for workers was the suggestion that the government could repeal hunting legislation. One of his team said to me: “Why couldn’t she (Theresa May) just shut up about that. It’s not a big issue but it could cost us a few hundred votes!”

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