Family killer believes he will walk free

MASS murderer Jeremy Bamber has said he still believes he will one day walk free from prison, despite being told he will spend the rest of his life behind bars.

MASS murderer Jeremy Bamber has said he still believes he will one day walk free from prison, despite being told he will spend the rest of his life behind bars.

Bamber, serving life for killing five members of his family at their Essex farmhouse in 1985, was told by a judge yesterday that the murders were so “exceptionally serious” that he would die in jail.

The killer was originally told he would serve 25 years, before former Home Secretary Michael Howard increased the sentence to his whole natural life.

The 47-year-old, who has always protested his innocence, had hoped to be given a tariff that would give him some hope of parole.

But after reviewing the case, Mr Justice Tugendhat said: “These murders were exceptionally serious.

“In my judgment, you ought to spend the whole of the rest of your life in prison, and I so order.”

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The judge said he had read submissions from Bamber's solicitors pointing out that he was not suffering from mental illness and was behaving and progressing well in prison.

He had also read victim impact statements from the remaining family members.

Bamber was found guilty by a majority verdict of shooting his wealthy adoptive parents, June and Nevill, his sister Sheila Caffell, and her six-year-old twin sons Daniel and Nicholas at their farmhouse in Tolleshunt D'Arcy, near Maldon.

The prosecution said he had murdered them out of greed, hoping to inherit a £500,000 fortune.

Bamber said: “I still believe that I will die a free man.

“But I find it incredible that on the one hand they say this and on the other hand they will have to release me for a retrial.

“I have the evidence that can prove my innocence but it does not make any difference - it seems that they can do what they like.

“The Criminal Cases Review Commission (CCRC) has had years to make its decision on the case.”

Bamber claims that there are 58 missing photos of the crime scene including key ones which show Sheila's body had been restaged.

He said: “I am prepared to have a retrial, I have done everything I can do get the case reviewed, it is utterly frustrating - I have told the truth since day-one to now, but all they want to do is suppress the evidence.”

Bamber's solicitor Marcus Farrar said: “We were hoping that there would be at least some prospect of knowing when he could be released, but to have no light at the end of the tunnel is a disappointment to him.”

He said there could be an appeal against the decision in the British courts, but did not rule out taking the case to the Europe.

A spokeswoman for the CCRC said they could not discuss the details of the missing photos.

She said: We are unable to say very much about this - just that the case is still under review and it is taking this amount of time because of the complexities of the case.”