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Farm machinery goes to museums

PUBLISHED: 23:11 19 February 2002 | UPDATED: 11:22 03 March 2010

SEVERAL decades-worth of old farm machinery collectables is to be handed over to museums following the death of the man who made the collection.

Frederic Dyer, 87, who died in January, had worked for Ransomes, Sims and Jefferies in Ipswich for 46 years, retiring in 1979 as a senior manager and recently helping to set up a museum dedicated to the firm.

SEVERAL decades-worth of old farm machinery collectables is to be handed over to museums following the death of the man who made the collection.

Frederic Dyer, 87, who died in January, had worked for Ransomes, Sims and Jefferies in Ipswich for 46 years, retiring in 1979 as a senior manager and recently helping to set up a museum dedicated to the firm.

His daughter, Sarah Ling, of Valley Farm, Wickham Market, said that his collection of old machinery is to be given to the Ransomes Museum, part of the Museum of East Anglian Life at Stowmarket, and to Reading Museum, which also specialises in such artefacts.

The museums would also share his slides and vast collection of notes on old farm machinery, including steam engines.

"Father was instrumental in setting up the Ransomes Museum and the firm was always close to his heart," said Mrs Ling.

Educated at Felsted School, Mr Dyer left the family farm at Rayne in Essex in 1933 – during a period of agricultural depression - to serve a special apprenticeship with Ransomes.

"In those days they still wore the old farm smocks and although they were phased out in the years after he joined the firm he continued to wear his until he reached the end of his apprenticeship," said Mrs Ling.

Within 10 years, Mr Dyer was appointed manager of the Plough Works, later renamed the Farm Machinery Works after the company moved to Nacton.

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