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Fears over suicide rate during downturn

PUBLISHED: 15:11 30 December 2008 | UPDATED: 12:50 09 March 2010

A CHARITY has today urged people to look out for family and friends after it was revealed that the economic crisis could lead to an increase in suicide rates.

A CHARITY has today urged people to look out for family and friends after it was revealed that the economic crisis could lead to an increase in suicide rates.

Research by Samaritans revealed that people who are unemployed are two to three times more likely to take their life than people with a job.

The Ipswich and East Suffolk branch of the charity said they hadn't noticed a specific increase in this area, but urged people to talk about their problems.

Joanna Bell, branch director, said: “We would encourage people to visit us or call us. There are concerns that people with money or job worries won't talk about it.

“We are here 24 hours a day and prepared to take an increase in calls.”

Research shows that unemployed men are more at risk than unemployed women.

Samaritans say unemployment can result in poorer mental health, such as anxiety and depression, lowered self-esteem and feelings of hopelessness - all of which increase the likelihood that someone will think that life is not worth living.

Samaritans receives 2.8million contacts a year by phone, email, letter and face-to-face.

Research undertaken by the charity shows that one in ten (about 280,000) contacts concerns financial issues.

YOU can contact the Samaritans in the following ways:

By dropping into the branch at 140 St Helen's Street, Ipswich, between 10am and 10pm everyday.

By calling 01473 211133 or 08457 909090.

By e-mailing jo@samaritans.org

Or you can write to: Chris, PO Box 9090, Stirling, FX8 2SA.

You can also log into www.samaritans.org for more information.

PROBLEM signs to look out for include someone:

Being withdrawn or unsociable.

Being low-spirited or depressed.

Drinking alcohol excessively or becoming dependent on drugs.

Being tearful or constantly fighting back tears.

Finding it hard to concentrate.

Feeling less energetic or particularly tired.


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