Fibres link accused to murder

THE prosecution case in the murder trail of 23-year-old Simon Hall at Norwich Crown Court is due to finish today. Hall, a 24seven employee, has denied killing 79 year-old Joan Albert, of Boydlands, Capel St Mary, who was found dead with stab wounds in her home on the morning of December 16, 2001.

THE prosecution case in the murder trail of 23-year-old Simon Hall at Norwich Crown Court is due to finish today.

Hall, a 24seven employee, has denied killing 79 year-old Joan Albert, of Boydlands, Capel St Mary, who was found dead with stab wounds in her home on the morning of December 16, 2001.

Police interviews were yesterday read to the court with Hall giving his explanation of his movements on the night December 15/16 and a description of what he was wearing.

The clothes he was wearing are significant claim the prosecution because it is alleged that what links him to the murder scene are hundreds of tiny black flock fibres shed from a garment with a pile found in his bedroom and cars.


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Hall told the interviewing officer, Det Con Leslie Volenhoven, he had been wearing navy jeans, a dark long-sleeved top with a "4" on and a dark grey "very fluffy" fleece from Next.

Asked what he did with his clothes when he took them off, Hall had replied: "I lay them on the floor or on the bean bag. I fold them up but I can't be bothered to hang them up."

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The fibres had been found in Hall's bedroom wardrobe, on the floor in front of it and on the beanbag.

Accounting for his movements on that Saturday night, Hall had told police he had gone to the Old Rep pub in Tower Street, Ipswich, where he worked part-time, though he was not on duty there that evening.

After a few drinks, he had gone with a friend to the Woolpack pub in Tuddenham Road, where there was a karaoke session.

When it closed, he had gone back to the Old Rep then to Liquid night club and back to the old Rep where the landlord was having a private party for his sister. Leaving there at 4am he walked about the town for two hours "just trying to sober up."

At 6am he had gone back to the Woolpack where he had left his car and got his car keys from the landlord after convincing him he was sober enough to drive.

Hall said he arrived home at 6.28. "It was 6.28 on the microwave clock. I remember."

When the interviewing officer commented: "That's very precise" Hall had replied: "I remember strange things like that: figures and pointless information. I'm the best one for pointless information.

Hall named friends he had been with during the evening but after driving friend Jamie back home at 6.05, he had been on his own.

He had marked his route home for police as best he could remember and had chatted to his mother when he got in, as she was pottering about in the kitchen.

Earlier that day, 14 witnesses had given evidence in tracing the black flock fibres back through the manufacturer of the cloth, the dyeing process and supply of the nylon all across Europe.

The case continues.

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