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Fire ravaged mill set for conversion

PUBLISHED: 19:38 29 December 2001 | UPDATED: 15:22 03 March 2010

A WOODBRIDGE mill, ravaged by fire around eight years ago, finally looks set to be turned into flats.

More than ten years ago, in 1989, planning permission was granted for the conversion and extension of the Deben Mill, Melton to form 58 flats.

A WOODBRIDGE mill, ravaged by fire around eight years ago, finally looks set to be turned into flats.

More than ten years ago, in 1989, planning permission was granted for the conversion and extension of the Deben Mill, Melton to form 58 flats.

Following the blaze in 1994, the buiding has become something of an eyesore in the area and it now looks like the mill will have to be completely rebuilt by developers, Bellway Homes.

Built in the 19th century, it closed as a mill around 1963 and was then used by Anglia Foods before it fell into disrepair.

Despite some criticism and opposition from both Melton parish council and Woodbridge town council, along with Railtrack, Suffolk County Council education department and some residents in the area, Suffolk Coastal District Council has recommended approval for the application.

Part of the site will also be devoted to employment areas as well as residential and planning permission had already been granted in 1989 for three two-storey office buildings.

Planning permission had been due to expire in March 2000 but the construction of a new road access into Melton Hill kept it live.

Some flats have already been built on the site and according to the developers, have already generated huge interest.

If approved, the new mill would be either five stories high with 29 one bedroomed flats and the same amount of two bedroomed flats.

Red bricks would be used to match the existing mill and 66 parking spaces and two refuse stores would also be included.

Melton parish councillors fear that not enough parking spaces have been allocated, as some couples in the apartments may have two cars, which would cause added pressure when visitors arrived.

But parish council clerk Trevor Brown conceded that despite this, it is recognised that something has to be done with the area which has been standing derelict.

Suffolk County Council education department is also requesting money from the developers to support education in the area.

The application comes under scrutiny by Suffolk Coastal's south area devlopment control sub-committee on January 9.


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