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First neuro-rehabilitation beds open in Suffolk

PUBLISHED: 05:30 15 January 2019 | UPDATED: 10:15 15 January 2019

The rooms will provide provisional care for people who have suffered head injuries Picture: ERICA REES

The rooms will provide provisional care for people who have suffered head injuries Picture: ERICA REES

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New rehab courses due to be introduced at a neurological centre could free up hospital beds and reduce future care plan costs.

Sue Ryder centre director Jo Marshall Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWNSue Ryder centre director Jo Marshall Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN

The Sue Ryder Neurological Care Home in Chantry, Ipswich, has expanded its provision to provide rehabilitative care for sufferers of acquired brain injuries.

Patients will be housed in the home’s new expansion of three new rooms, all due to open on Thursday, January 31.

The rooms will be used to deliver short-term rehab courses to help return patients to the community after hospital stays.

The centre’s neurological director, Jo Marshall, believes the expansion could lead to less money having to be spent on care once patients are able to go home.

One ofthe new rehabilitation rooms at the Sue Ryder centre Picture: ERICA REESOne ofthe new rehabilitation rooms at the Sue Ryder centre Picture: ERICA REES

She said: “There has been lots of research saying that those people who receive this provisional care at the right time see their later care costs reduced.

“If they don’t get that rehabilitative care then it is likely that they will never reach a level of independence.

“What we have here is not available any where else in Suffolk.

“We can give specialist care to someone who could otherwise be blocking an acute hospital bed.”

Ipswich Hospital have been looking to expand such provision for at least two years as no such services existed in Suffolk before the expansion.

Patients who require level two rehab care are stable but require specialist treatment which is usually delivered across a short-term programme.

Before the expansion of the Sue Ryder centre, patients in Suffolk would have to leave the county to receive this kind of care.

Mark Pepper, senior transformation lead for Ipswich Hospital, has worked with Sue Ryder to complete the project.

He said he was excited at the prospect of patients receiving care much closer to home.

“The therapies team and I are extremely pleased to be able to support neurological patients to remain in Suffolk where they can be near their family and friends,” he said.

“This is better for their rehabilitation and means that they’re likely to improve faster.

“It can take a long time for patients to recover from neurological disorders, and having the beds at the Sue Ryder facility means that our patients can be treated in more appropriate surroundings.”

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