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Flooding clean up begins

PUBLISHED: 11:01 23 October 2001 | UPDATED: 10:43 03 March 2010

THE mop up after the deluge continued today as parts of Suffolk recovered from heavy rains that have lashed the region.

With floods now subsiding, council emergency workers are keeping a wary eye on rivers in the county.

THE mop up after the deluge continued today as parts of Suffolk recovered from heavy rains that have lashed the region.

With floods now subsiding, council emergency workers are keeping a wary eye on rivers in the county.

Sandbags stockpiled in village caches along the Gipping Valley are now the main defences against further flooding following last year's incidents at Hoxne, Fressingfield, Needham Market, Rattlesden and Baylham.

Although these towns and villages have escaped flooding so far this year, the sandbags are an important precaution said emergency planning office Tony O'Shaughnessy, at Mid Suffolk District Council.

As details came through from the Environment Agency of a flood watch alert on the rivers Gipping and Deben this morning, he added that there had been "a couple" of requests for further sandbags from the council's depot in Stowmarket.

Flood watch is the least serious level of alert issued by the Environment Agency, coming after severe flood warning and flood warning. Minsmere, Thorpeness, plus the Alde and Ore rivers were also on flood watch.

The village of Cavendish was one of the worst affected areas in Suffolk with the roads in and out of the area last night completely "impassable", according to a county council spokesman.

Elsewhere, a spokeswoman for Babergh District Council said that concerns for rising water levels in parts of the Stour Valley near Sudbury had levelled off along with the water level without any action being taken.

"We're keeping the situation under observation," she added, as flood warnings remained in place on the Stour.

Northern reaches of Essex near the Suffolk border were the worst hit by torrential downpours on Sunday with the rivers Colne, Blackwater, Brain and Pant bursting their banks at Halstead, Braintree, Kelvedon and Braintree, closing roads and forcing some residents to evacuate.

The A12 was swamped in the Marks Tey area, effectively cutting off the main road link to East Anglia and causing huge tailbacks. But today as severe flood warnings were scaled down to flood warnings in these areas, the A12 was running as normal.

A spokesman for the Environment Agency said the River Cam whose level had risen alarmingly just outside Cambridge city centre was the only river in East Anglia still on severe flood warning this morning.

Meanwhile, further rain is forecast for the region during the week.

"There is no sign of any lasting dry spells," said the Evening Star weatherman Ken Blowers.

For further information about flooding call the Environment Agency's 24 hour Floodline on 0845 9881188 or visit the website at www.environment-agency.gov.uk

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