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Forget UFOs - this is yobs' work

PUBLISHED: 12:59 23 August 2001 | UPDATED: 10:28 03 March 2010

THE mystery of crop circles has struck in Suffolk – right beside one of the busiest junctions in the county.

The five separate circles, the largest of which is 35 metres across, appeared in a field of wheat close to the Copdock Mill interchange - to the amusement of passers-by and the dismay of farm workers.

THE mystery of crop circles has struck in Suffolk – right beside one of the busiest junctions in the county.

The five separate circles, the largest of which is 35 metres across, appeared in a field of wheat close to the Copdock Mill interchange - to the amusement of passers-by and the dismay of farm workers.

Crop circles are a very rare phenomenon in Suffolk. Theories as to their formation abound with some people believing they are connected to aliens and UFOs with others putting their mysterious appearance down to unusual whirlwinds or ancient ley-lines.

According to Washbrook-based farmer Russell Faulds, however, who saw large areas of his premier crop destroyed by the phenomenon, there is not a grain of truth in any of them.

Today he laid the cause of the mysterious circles firmly in the hands of mindless vandals and said that the crop circles were "the last thing" he needed in what had been "the worst farming year in probably 100 years".

Brushing aside rife speculation as to how these circles are formed, Mr Faulds said: "To my mind it's nothing but criminal damage. If I were to go into people's gardens and trample them down I don't think they would like it. I'm not amused by it."

Mr Faulds, who farms 750 acres of land around the Belstead and Washbrook area, first became aware of the circles ten days ago, but says he has not reported the phenomenon as without a likely culprit he fears he would be wasting police time.

The giant marks, which are visible from the London-bound carriageway of the A12 near Ipswich and the Pinewood estate, appeared in a field of premier bread making wheat and Mr Faulds says the cost of the phenomenon was "unquantifiable" until the crop has been harvested.

"On top of everything else we have been through including weather wise, particularly in the last 12 months, we really don't need anything else to pile on the agony," he added.

This is not the first time misfortune has struck Mr Fauld's business. Two years ago torrential rain caused massive gully almost 70m long and two metres deep to be washed out in his Washbrook field.

Crop circles are a relatively common sight in Britain especially around harvest time, but there have been very few reports of the phenomenon in Suffolk.

Sightings were reported near Colchester in August 1996 and on the Birch Estate, Essex in July last year.

Crop Circle Research
Crop Circle Connector
Crop Circle Central (Paradigm Shift)

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