Former Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams delivers sermon to staff and pupils of Ipswich School

From left: Nicholas Weaver, Headmaster of Ipswich School; Cllr Roger Fern, Mayor of Ipswich; The Rt

From left: Nicholas Weaver, Headmaster of Ipswich School; Cllr Roger Fern, Mayor of Ipswich; The Rt Rev Martin Seeley, Bishop of St Edmundsbury and Ipswich; The Rt Rev and Rt Hon the Lord Williams of Oystermouth; Rev Holly Crompton-Battersby, Ipswich School Chaplain; Rev Canon Charles Jenkins, Vicar of St Mary-le-Tower; Nigel Farthing, Vice-Chairman of Governors at Ipswich School - Credit: Archant

A former Archbishop of Canterbury was the guest preacher at an event celebrating the long history of Ipswich School this week.

Rowan Williams, now Baron Williams of Oystermouth, was at the school’s traditional Commemoration of Benefactors at St Mary-le-Tower church on Monday.

The service was attended by pupils, staff, school governors and the Mayor of Ipswich Roger Fern.

As part of his sermon, Lord Williams urged everyone, but especially pupils attening the service, to be ‘a sign of promise, affirmation and welcome to society’, and to ‘meet the deep hunger of humanity’.”

His message to the congregation was that beneath all the diversity there is one humanity and one story which is interlinked, saying that one of the most important things education can do is not just to give successes but to give a vision of belonging and a sense of being in a community where we are contributing to others.


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He also made reference to the opening of the Headmaster’s traditional Commemoration address, which refers to ‘The Brothers and Sisters of the Guild of Corpus Christi, who sponsored the School in its early days’.

The Guild of Corpus Christi started Ipswich School in the South Isle of St Mary-Le-Tower Church.

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Headmaster Nicholas Weaver said: “We were delighted that Lord Williams was able to give up his time to speak to us so powerfully.

“His words chimed with the Ipswich School core values of care for the community and the transforming power of education, which is what we strive to unlock in all our pupils.”

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