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From clergy to conservationists, the Queen honours Suffolk's great and good as she celebrates 90th birthday

PUBLISHED: 22:30 10 June 2016

Newmarket-based Hayley Turner

Newmarket-based Hayley Turner

Suffolk people involved in a range of different activities - both professionally and in their spare time - have been recognised in the Queen's Birthday honours for their dedication and hard work.

Malcolm Fisher, retiring secretary of the Norfolk Churches trust.Malcolm Fisher, retiring secretary of the Norfolk Churches trust.

Malcolm Fisher, 76, of Laxfield, said he felt “highly honoured” after receiving an MBE for his work with the Norfolk Churches Trust.

He said: “Being involved with the Norfolk Churches Trust was quietly rewarding. I am thankful of what has been achieved but there is still so much more to be done.”

Protecting East Anglia’s residents from flooding and coastal erosion is among the toughest jobs in the region, according to newly-appointed OBE Dr Charles Beardall.

Dr Beardall, of Orford, who has served as the Environment Agency’s area manager for Norfolk, Suffolk, and Essex in the last 10 years, was given the honour for services to flood protection and combating coastal erosion in East Anglia.

He said: “I was extremely surprised and absolutely thrilled when I got the letter.

“In terms of managing floods and erosion it is one of the most challenging jobs in the country.

“I’m really pleased with the honour but the work we do is a real team effort from everyone.”

Also receiving an OBE is former jockey Hayley Turner, 33, of Newmarket, for services to horseracing.

Bishop Tim StevensBishop Tim Stevens

She said: “It’s been really difficult trying to keep it a secret, it’s such an honour and I can’t quite believe it.

“When it came to deciding on something to do with my life, I went into racing because I really enjoyed riding and I wasn’t academic.”

The Rt Rev Tim Stevens, 69, of Bury St Edmunds, a former Bishop of Dunwich, is made a CBE.

Bishop Tim was ordained in 1976, starting his ministry in east London before becoming team rector at Canvey Island and serving as the Bishop of Chelmsford’s urban officer, then returning to the capital as Archdeacon of West Ham.

He was Bishop of Dunwich from 1995 to 1999 when he was appointed Bishop of Leicester, retiring to Suffolk last year. He served as one of the Lords Spiritual in the House of Lords, and is currently a non executive director of the Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust.

He receives his CBE for services to the Church of England and the community in Leicestershire.

Harriet Fear, of Great Bricett, chief executive officer for One Nucleus, received an MBE, for services to business in the health and life sciences sectors.

Miss Fear said: “I firmly believe I am incredibly fortunate to do the job I do. To receive an honour is very humbling and I look forward to continuing to work together with my wonderful team, with the support of a fantastic Board, to help our members maximise their global competitiveness.”

Angelina Quamina, an executive officer at the Ministry of Defence, is awarded an MBE for services to US Air Force personnel and their families at RAF Lakenheath.

John Charles Ball, a technician for urban search and rescue with Essex County Fire and Rescue Service, also receives an MBE for services to national and international search and rescue.

Former jockey Hayley Turner, from Newmarket, said it had been “really difficult” keeping her OBE for services to horseracing a secret.

The 33-year-old retired at the end of last season after regularly breaking new ground during her career.

The Nottinghamshire-born jockey became the first female rider to win a Group One contest outright in Britain when steering the David Simcock-trained Dream Ahead to victory in the July Cup at Newmarket in 2011 and followed up when Margot Did won the Nunthorpe Stakes for Michael Bell a month later.

“It’s been really difficult trying to keep it a secret, it’s such an honour and I can’t quite believe it,” she told Press Association Sport.

“My family are not from a racing background, but my mum was a riding instructor. When it came to deciding on something to do with my life, I went into racing because I really enjoyed riding and I wasn’t academic.”

She said being a jockey meant she travelled across the world.

“It’s so nice to be recognised,” she added. “It’s a tough job but the highs are brilliant. One day you are a hero but the next you start all over again.

“I had some bad injuries, particularly the one at Doncaster, that was the toughest to come back from, but my family and friends gave me loads of support and I got my confidence back. I was able to leave on a high, which I was determined to do.”

Harriet Fear, from Great Bricett, has been honoured for her services to business in the health and life science sectors.

Miss Fear joined Cambridge-based One Nucleus (formerly ERBI), which is an international membership organisation for life science and healthcare companies, as CEO in 2009.

Despite only having a core staff of 10, the not for profit company has a turnover of £1million and under her leadership has grown to be the largest organisation of its kind in Europe, with around 500 companies signed up as members.

And despite not having a commercial or scientific background, in her role as CEO she has helped member companies maximise their global competitiveness and One Nucleus has broadened its membership, to include more life science and healthcare companies.

Miss Fear, who used to work in the foreign office before relocating to the area in 2003, also has an advisory role at 10 Downing Street in the life sciences sector. In this role, which is voluntary, she has undertaken a number of key activities, including leading a business delegation to India in February 2015.

She said: “It’s been really hard keeping it a secret, but you have to.”

Miss Fear was also complimentary about the village where she lives, believing it helped her professionally.

“When you’re away you live and breathe it wherever you’re working,” she said.

“But when I came back in 2008 I made it very clear that I needed to have a good work/life balance and being in the village really affords me that.

“It’s about an hour from work to home and that gives me a chance to process and think about the day and reflect on work an priorities.”

She said: “I firmly believe I am incredibly fortunate to do the job I do. Our members consistently and constantly impress the team with their innovation, commitment to the people who are ultimately most important – patients, and support for the team and myself. They make all our jobs here truly rewarding.

“To receive an honour is very humbling and I look forward to continuing to work together with my wonderful team, with the support of a fantastic Board, to help our members maximise their global competitiveness’.

The Suffolk list

CBE

• The Right Reverend Timothy John Stevens. For services to the Church of England and the community in Leicestershire. (Bury St Edmunds)

OBE

• Dr Charles Henry Beardall. Area manager Norfolk, Suffolk and Essex, Environment Agency. For services to Flood Protection and Combating Coastal Erosion in East Anglia. (Suffolk)

• Ms Hayley Turner. For services to Horseracing. (Newmarket)

MBE

• John Charles Ball. Technician, Urban Search and Rescue, Essex County Fire and Rescue Service. For services to National and International Search and Rescue.

• Miss Harriet Emma Fear. Chief Executive Officer, One Nucleus. For services to Business in the Health and Life Sciences Sectors. (Great Bricett)

• Malcolm George Fisher. For services to the Heritage of Norfolk’s Churches through the Norfolk Churches Trust. (Laxfield)

• Ms Angelina Carol Quamina. Executive Officer. Ministry of Defence. For services to US Air Force Personnel and their Families at RAF Lakenheath.

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