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Fury after papers get lost in post

PUBLISHED: 04:04 18 December 2001 | UPDATED: 11:02 03 March 2010

A FELIXSTOWE man is furious after losing vital documents in the post – yet the apology from mail bosses took less than one working day to arrive!

Stuart Long sent an envelope of documents to the Ombudsman by recorded delivery, but they never turned up and he missed his deadline for getting the information to the investigation service.

A FELIXSTOWE man is furious after losing vital documents in the post – yet the apology from mail bosses took less than one working day to arrive!

Stuart Long sent an envelope of documents to the Ombudsman by recorded delivery, but they never turned up and he missed his deadline for getting the information to the investigation service.

"I am involved in a dispute with a housing association and I had a deadline to meet to get my papers to the Ombudsman. I thought recorded delivery was the best way to send them," said Mr Long, of Grange Road.

The documents were sent on November 26 and have now been officially classed as "lost" by Consignia, the service which runs the Royal Mail.

"They sent me a letter to explain that the documents were lost and six first class stamps as compensation. Six first class stamps – it's an insult," he fumed.

"Those documents took more than a week to prepare and now I have missed the deadline I do not know what will happen to my appeal.

"The letter of apology was posted on a Friday at 9.30am and arrived at mine at 8.30am on the Monday – not even one working day, so they can handle their own post without problems."

He had recently ordered an item from Denmark which had arrived safely within two weeks, and written to a large company in Reading and received a reply with seven days, yet the £1.20 recorded delivery to London had got lost.

"It would have been quicker and easier to have taken the letter myself – the postal service is a shambles and it's no wonder it is losing money and needs to put so many people out of work," added Mr Long, who lives with his wife Susan and their children, Alexander, 10, and Eleanor, three.

A spokesman for Consignia said recorded delivery was not a guaranteed delivery service, though there was proof of a receipt of a letter or parcel because someone had to sign for it when it was delivered.

The company gave up to £26 compensation but it was difficult to put a price on documents with no cash value.

For greater security, people should use the special delivery service, which guaranteed delivery by 12.30pm the next day and carried greater insurance which enabled more compensation to be paid if post got lost.

There was still a chance Mr Long's letter would turn up as all letters which were "lost" but subsequently found, or which could not be delivered because of damage or wrong address, were sent to a special department in Belfast to be investigated and returned if possible to the sender.


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