Ghostbusters set to hang up ectoplasm

EAST Anglia may be home to some spine-chilling ghost stories - but for one group of paranormal investigators the county just isn't Most Haunted enough!Suffolk's Ghostbusters ain't afraid of no ghosts - but they've blamed the closure of their enterprise on a lack of interest in the unexplained.

EAST Anglia may be home to some spine-chilling ghost stories - but for one group of paranormal investigators the county just isn't Most Haunted enough!

Suffolk's Ghostbusters ain't afraid of no ghosts - but they've blamed the closure of their enterprise on a lack of interest in the unexplained.

The supernatural venture began as a hobby but quickly grew into the East Anglian Paranormal Investigation Group.

The team of intrepid spook-hunters trawled the region for ghouls and goblins but soon discovered that the region's reputation for things that go bump in the night was unfounded.

Ian Proctor, 34, of Haughley, founded the group. His interest in all things mysterious dated back to when he was a child.

He said: “When I was five years old I had meningitis and at one stage was given just six hours to live. I remember leaving my body and floating above the hospital bed. I had to cling on before I was sucked up.”

Most Read

Mr Proctor set about recruiting other believers and created a website for the group. He divided his time between the investigation team and his day job as a health assistant.

He said: “The group started life in the summer of 2006 and was made up of me and my friend Sally Goddard but by the time it was over and done with, we were five members strong.

“We advertised through our website and word of mouth and wrote lots of letters to places we thought were haunted. In the end we just got fed up with people turning us down. Nine times out of ten there would be no response.”

The group ran a free ghost hunting service for nearly a year before they were forced to bring the venture to a close.

Among the group's spooky missions was a chilling visit to Borley Church, near Sudbury, considered to be one of the most haunted buildings in the country.

Mr Proctor said: “The rectory was supposedly haunted until it was burned down in the 1930s, at which point all the activity moved over to the church.

“We didn't see anything while we were there but when we developed the photos there were some anomalies and you could see a mist in all the pictures that wasn't there at the time.”

Another visit to Derby Gaol saw the group hold a séance to help reach the other side.

Mr Proctor said: “There was lots of noise and movement that time. We contacted the old jailer who worked there but he wasn't happy about it. There was a foul and rotten smell in the room which was supposed to be his bad breath.”

Mr Proctor admits to being slightly less convinced about the paranormal and is happy leaving the investigation work to other people.

Sally Goddard, who helped start the group, was doubtful from the outset. She said: “I worked with Ian and he was interested in the paranormal so we decided to give it a go. I was always sceptical and that's really why I went along. I think people watch Most Haunted and get carried away.

“I don't know if I would go back and do it again. If there are spirits on the other side, they don't want to be disturbed.”

East Anglia's ghostly legends:

Borley Rectory: Burned down in March 1939 - it was reputed to be haunted by many spirits and poltergeists and was reputed to be the most haunted house in Britain.

Black Shuck: The hell-hound of the Suffolk/Norfolk border. Anyone who sees the fearsome black dog can expect to die in a year and a day. There are scratches on the door of Blythburgh Church which are said to have been made by Black Shuck in the middle ages.

Dunwich: Ghostly monks are said to haunt the ruins of the old Priory - and the bells of lost churches can sometimes be heard at sea.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter