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Signed photo of Cradle of Filth singer among strangest gifts to Suffolk police

A signed picture of Cradle of Filth singer Dani Filth was among gifts to Suffolk police Picture: NICK BUTCHER

A signed picture of Cradle of Filth singer Dani Filth was among gifts to Suffolk police Picture: NICK BUTCHER

Gifts offered to Suffolk police officers in recent years have been revealed - with a signed photograph of Cradle of Filth singer Dani Filth worth just £5 among the more unusual items.

A hand-painted picture of Jesus Christ also features on the list Picture: GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO/HEMERAA hand-painted picture of Jesus Christ also features on the list Picture: GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO/HEMERA

A hand-painted picture of Jesus (£5), a baby names book (£1) and three pheasants (£10) also feature on lists of gifts sent to people working at Suffolk Constabulary, all of which have to be declared.

The signed Dani Filth photo was accepted by the police but later donated to St Elizabeth Hospice.

Over the last four years, since 2016, nearly £20,000 worth of gifts have been sent to officers at all different ranks - from PCSOs to the force executive.

Some were rejected - including a golf trolley worth £199 from the International Communications Data and Digital Forensics Seminars - while others, such as 20 complimentary tickets to Aqua Park Suffolk worth £360, were accepted. Only 18 of these were used.

A baby names book worth £1 was among gifts to Suffolk police Picture: GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTOA baby names book worth £1 was among gifts to Suffolk police Picture: GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO

Other items on the list include:

- Six sticks of rhubarb from a member of public (£1)

- A wood burner from Southwold Town Council (£20)

- Deer antlers and skulls from a member of public (£50)

Three pheasants were also gifted to Suffolk Constabulary Picture: BARRY PULLEN/CITIZENSIDEThree pheasants were also gifted to Suffolk Constabulary Picture: BARRY PULLEN/CITIZENSIDE

- Petrol system cleaner from a member of public (£2.50)

- A rounder's bat and ball from Castle Manor School in Haverhill (£5)

- Six eggs from a member of the public (£1)

- Four McDonalds coffees (£8)

Deer antlers and skulls are among gifts to Suffolk police since 2016 Picture: BEN BIRCHALL/PA IMAGESDeer antlers and skulls are among gifts to Suffolk police since 2016 Picture: BEN BIRCHALL/PA IMAGES

Some of the more costly items included wildlife cameras and a set of PPE trousers, from Suffolk Young Farmers, worth £400.

Meanwhile, a sparkling water worth £1 given to Chief Constable Steve Jupp at the Wattisham Flying Station's 'cocktail party and sounding retreat' was among the least valuable.

The majority of gifts were food and drink products - from confectionary and canapes to hot drinks and alcohol.

Gifts sent to police from the 2016/17 financial year onwards came to a total value of £19,430.

A wood burner was also among gifts to Suffolk police Picture: PETER BASH/CITIZENSIDE.COMA wood burner was also among gifts to Suffolk police Picture: PETER BASH/CITIZENSIDE.COM

Last year, 2018/19, was the most generous year with £11,696 worth of gifts given.

"All members of constabulary staff are required to declare any offer or acceptance of a gift and this is closely monitored by the professional standards department," a police spokesman said.

For instance, a long-serving officer who had worked in a community for many years was offered and accepted gift vouchers from the parish councils on his retirement.

"Another example might be a victim of a burglary who is extremely grateful for officers' work and is very insistent that those officers accept some small token, such as a box of chocolates.

Most offers of a gift are politely refused unless it is considered a refusal would cause offence - if it is felt that a refusal of the gift would cause offence then the gift is accepted and the officer would report their acceptance to the professional standards department via their area commander, which is then recorded on a register.

He added: "Other gifts, which are of a higher value, are referred to chief officers for consideration on a case-by-case basis.

"The chief officer will decide whether the gift should be retained or returned - in many instances the gift is forwarded to a local charity or other deserving cause, and are often donated as raffle prizes."

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