Grandmother to continue legal battle

A GRANDMOTHER has vowed to fight on and seek legal advice about challenging the Home Office, after her partner died of neglect in prison.Prison bosses were told to address medical procedures after Margaret Tribble's partner of 11 years, 42-year-old inmate Anthony Everett suffered a fatal heart attack in a Norwich prison cell.

A GRANDMOTHER has vowed to fight on and seek legal advice about challenging the Home Office, after her partner died of neglect in prison.

Prison bosses were told to address medical procedures after Margaret Tribble's partner of 11 years, 42-year-old inmate Anthony Everett suffered a fatal heart attack in a Norwich prison cell.

As the Star reported on Thursday, a two-day inquest ruled that "system neglect" contributed to his death from natural causes.

Smoker Mr Everett from Norwich was serving a 21-month sentence for dangerous driving and driving while disqualified, when he suffered the attack on February 12.

He had been jailed after twice ramming a police car with a van, as officers tried to pull him over. He was a banned driver at the time of the incident in July 2001.

Following the inquest verdict, coroner William Armstrong told the prison service that medical records should have been made available to staff. He said they were not available in this case.

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Mrs Tribble, 57, of Alderlee, Ipswich, said: "I've been through nine months of hell, with his death then his inquest.

"The inquest verdict wasn't exactly what I wanted. The next step is going to see my solicitor to seek advice on whether I have a case for compensation.

"I have to find out who is legally responsible for the neglect proved at the inquest - whether it's the prison service or the Home Office.

"I have heard the prisons area manager is investigating again, and I just hope it never happens again. When my friend came out of Highpoint she said she'd had to wait four weeks to see a doctor. When you're in prison you have to do your time, but you don't deserve neglect, so I have to fight on."

She said: "I have spoken to people whose relatives have died in prison, and they don't know you can get free legal help. People think that after the inquest it is all over, but they should contact me if they want more help."

She remembers Everett as a 'very polite person.'

She said: "If you read any of my letters from him, you'd see why everybody said he was a nice person. He was in prison with serious criminals but he was always polite to them. When I first met him he was in and out (of prison) every week but in the last few years he was better."

She thanked her London solicitor, barrister, the jury, the media, and prison officers who she said did what they could within their limited roles.

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