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Grieving mother's disgust with Blair

PUBLISHED: 09:41 30 December 2001 | UPDATED: 15:22 03 March 2010

A DEVOTED mother says she has been let down by Prime Minister, Tony Blair, who she claims offered little help in the search for her son's killer.

Frances Morris recently penned a heart-felt plea to Mr Blair urging him to assist with the unsolved murder of Karl Morris in 1999.

A DEVOTED mother says she has been let down by Prime Minister, Tony Blair, who she claims offered little help in the search for her son's killer.

Frances Morris recently penned a heart-felt plea to Mr Blair urging him to assist with the unsolved murder of Karl Morris in 1999.

But Mrs Morris, of Great Cornard, has hit out after receiving a letter from Mr Blair's secretary, Stephen Clarke, which she claims offers little, if any, help.

She claims the Prime Minister has fobbed her off, and criticised him for not replying to her personally. She is also angered because the letter she received from Downing Street spelt her name incorrectly.

"Mr Blair preaches equality, but he has shown a real lack of equality here. In the high profile case of Damilola Taylor he made time to break off from his busy schedule to attend a special memorial service and even have a private meeting with the Taylor family, but what has he done for me?

"I am disgusted that the Prime Minister cannot even be bothered to write back personally and I think the fact they even spelt my name wrong shows they have no interest in the case."

Although Downing Street representatives have said the details of the Karl Morris case will be passed on to the Home Office, it suggests Mr Blair will not become personally involved.

The letter states: "Mr Blair was sorry to hear of the sad loss of your son and sends his deepest sympathy. I am sorry that it is not possible for Mr Blair to reply personally, but as you will appreciate he receives many thousands of letters each week.

"The subject of your son's case is the responsibility of the Home Office. Mr Blair has asked that your letter is forwarded to that department who will also wish to be aware of your concerns and reply to the detailed points you raise."

Karl Morris was just 23 when he was killed following a fracas outside the Queen's Arms pub, Great Cornard, on April 3, 1999.

Stephen Mackay, 29, the man police want to question in connection with the fight, has now been missing for nearly three years.

Although Suffolk police have launched national and international appeals, followed up 250 lines of inquiry and taken 80 statements, they have not managed to find him.

Mrs Morris says she accepts Suffolk Constabulary has done everything it can in the case, but says the net needs to be widened to discover the whereabouts of Mr Mackay. She says she now feels abandoned by the authorities.

"Everything has been done locally to try and trace Mr Mackay, but to no avail. The case needs more publicity and that is why I contacted Mr Blair, but obviously he is not able to help."


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