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Silhouettes appear on village green in rememberance of 'The Haughley Lads'

PUBLISHED: 16:30 31 October 2019 | UPDATED: 06:52 01 November 2019

Kieron Palmer has created an installation of silhouettes of the 41 soldiers who lost their lives in the world wars.  Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN

Kieron Palmer has created an installation of silhouettes of the 41 soldiers who lost their lives in the world wars. Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN

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Silent silhouettes have appeared on a village green in Suffolk in honour of the men who gave their lives in the line of duty.

Kieron Palmer has created an installation of silhouettes of the 41 soldiers who lost their lives in the world wars.  Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWNKieron Palmer has created an installation of silhouettes of the 41 soldiers who lost their lives in the world wars. Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN

The black figures have appeared before Armistice Day in the centre of Haughley in a bid to bring neighbours together in remembering those from the village who died during the world wars.

Each of the black, metal figures, shaped to represent one of the 'The Haughley Lads' - has been labelled with a name of one of the men who died during the conflicts. The person behind the display, Kieron Palmer, is also the owner of the historic Palmers Bakery. He wanted to create the installation to remember the men, as well as raise money for The Royal British Legion.

He Said: "Last year it was the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War and we planted daffodils on the green and when I walked amongst them they felt like soldiers, they were really solitary and still.

"It gave me the idea of doing the silhouettes this year.

Kieron Palmer has created an installation of silhouettes of the 41 soldiers who lost their lives in the world wars.  Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWNKieron Palmer has created an installation of silhouettes of the 41 soldiers who lost their lives in the world wars. Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN

"It's important to visualise how many died. Seeing a number means it is sometimes difficult to see how many made the sacrificed themselves. It is really emotional walking amongst them, I get goose bumps. It's really poignant.

"It is important to remember those that lost their lives because without them, we all wouldn't be here today.

"It is important to bring people together, it gives us a chance to remember the sacrifice that they all made."

Mr Palmer paid for the models out of his own pocket and started making them in March alongside a friend, finishing two a week before painting them black.

Kieron Palmer has created an installation of silhouettes of the 41 soldiers who lost their lives in the world wars.  Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWNKieron Palmer has created an installation of silhouettes of the 41 soldiers who lost their lives in the world wars. Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN

The silhouettes will remain in place during the season of remembrance for all to see and Mr Palmer hopes it will bring more people to the village.

He said: "I hope more people come through the village to see it. The display brings home the sheer loss of young life as you wander amongst it, bringing together physical representations of all 41 men.

"It is important that even a small village like Haughley honours the men who fell for them."

This year, November 11 will mark the 101st anniversary of Remembrance Day.

Kieron Palmer has created an installation of silhouettes of the 41 soldiers who lost their lives in the world wars.  Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWNKieron Palmer has created an installation of silhouettes of the 41 soldiers who lost their lives in the world wars. Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN

People will gather across the county to take part in a two minutes silence in memory of all those who have died in the line of duty.

Kieron Palmer has created an installation of silhouettes of the 41 soldiers who lost their lives in the world wars.  Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWNKieron Palmer has created an installation of silhouettes of the 41 soldiers who lost their lives in the world wars. Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN

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