Heads shortage in schools

SCHOOLS are losing their heads and finding it difficult to replace them.Headteachers should enjoy power and prestige within the communities in which they work.

SCHOOLS are losing their heads and finding it difficult to replace them.

Headteachers should enjoy power and prestige within the communities in which they work.

But a survey into the top job in schools found fewer and fewer teachers want the stress that goes along with the responsibility.

And Stoke High School headteacher Martin Liddle is not surprised by the results of the survey.

Mr Liddle, who is a National Headteachers' Association official, said: "It's getting increasingly difficult to find staff automatically who want to take on additional responsibility.

"They find the workload is enough so they are not desperate for more responsibility.

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"It's particularly difficult to recruit deputy heads in primary schools where they have a full teaching workload as well as the added responsibility."

The survey, carried out on behalf of two headteachers' unions, found half of all primary vacancies attracted fewer than five applications.

And an average of only 16 people applied for headteacher posts at secondary schools.

Survey findings also show headteachers are retiring earlier, making the labour market even more difficult.

Mr Liddle also highlighted headteachers' pay as factor putting off candidates.

He said: "The association is saying that comparisons with business show that given the range of the responsibilities additional remuneration should be considered."

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