Heroin and cocaine supplier caged

A MAN who was involved in a conspiracy with footballer Kieron Dyer's sister and other people to supply heroin and cocaine has been jailed for three and a half years.

Jane Hunt

A MAN who was involved in a conspiracy with footballer Kieron Dyer's sister and other people to supply heroin and cocaine has been jailed for three and a half years.

Lewis Self of Wilding Road, Ipswich admitted conspiring to supply drugs on the basis that he was under threat of violence from other people involved in the enterprise.

Jailing Self for three and a half years less 179 days he has already spent in custody, Judge David Goodin said that allowing his home to be used as a store from which dealers could go out and supply people was a significant part of the conspiracy.


You may also want to watch:


He accepted that Self's participation in the conspiracy was limited in terms of time and he also accepted he was subjected to pressure from other people to be involved.

Ipswich Crown Court heard that Kirsha Dyer, Self and five other people, including a teenager, had conspired to supply crack cocaine and heroin in 2007. All the defendants apart from Self were sentenced for their part in the conspiracy last month.

Most Read

Dyer, 20, of Bentley Road, Ipswich was jailed for nearly six years and her boyfriend Maxwell Appah, 22, formerly of Canterbury Close, Ipswich was jailed for seven years.

Dare Salau, 22, also formerly of Canterbury Close, who was said to be the leader of the conspiracy was jailed for eight years as was his second in command Simon Akakpo, 21, of Rainham. Pannick Nikuna, 21, of Edgeware was jailed for four and a half years as was a teenager.

Self, Dyer, Nikuna and the teenager all pleaded guilty to the conspiracy but Akakpo, Appah and Salau were found guilty after a trial in May.

The court heard that Dyer drove her associates to London to buy drugs and then brought the drugs back to Ipswich for sale in an operation known as the “J” business.

Greg Perrins for Self said he had made admissions during interviews with police which had caused him extreme difficulties with his co-defendants.

He said Self had expressed concern about being sent to the same prison where the people he had sought to implicate in his interviews were being held.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter