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Holiday post delays frustrate troops

PUBLISHED: 12:37 19 April 2003 | UPDATED: 13:45 03 March 2010

TROOPS spending Easter in Iraq are egged off by the trickle of mail that is reaching them over the festive break.

While the rest of the country enjoys the Easter bank holiday weekend, waiting for snail mail British Forces Post Office has gone beyond a yolk for soldiers as they face the next four days without post.

TROOPS spending Easter in Iraq are egged off by the trickle of mail that is reaching them over the festive break.

While the rest of the country enjoys the Easter bank holiday weekend, waiting for snail mail British Forces Post Office has gone beyond a yolk for soldiers as they face the next four days without post.

BFPO mail flights have been suspended over the break - which means brave men and women who have fought a war over the last four weeks will wait even longer for precious words from home

Delays have meant some squaddies going for more than three weeks for parcels from home – items of post that they know have been sent.

One fumed: "We've fought through a war and it would be nice to come out the other end knowing that we able to keep contact with our families.

"With the lack of email and the use of phones limited, mail is our only medium.

"During the actual fighting things moved at such a pace that the need for mail wasn't so great but now we've got a bit of time on hands the guys are going a little stir crazy and getting a bit of cabin fever.

"In the day and age when post can travel across the globe in 24 hours, it's hard to comprehend how a letter can take 14 days to arrive out here."

A 22-year-old soldier from Essex said: "My parents have told me they've sent 60 blueys and eight parcels. Only ten of the blueys have arrived and just three of the parcels. What's going on?"

A veteran of the last Gulf War said: "Last time we were getting our mail by the truckload whatever the situation. It's a bit odd we not getting the same service when twelve years on technology has advanced."

An MOD spokesman said he wasn't aware of any difficulties getting the post out to the Gulf.

Grubby squaddies in the field near Almara, central Iraq have been heartened by the arrival of a mobile bath and laundry team from the Royal Logistics Corps, led by an officer who rejoices in the name Sophie Waters.

No prizes for guessing that troops from 3 Regiment Army Air Corps have rechristened her Soapy Waters.


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