Hospital cleaning raises concerns

AS IPSWICH Hospital struggles to cope with infections, it seems strange to report that some of the site is to see its cleaning regime reduced from daily to weekly.

AS IPSWICH Hospital struggles to cope with infections, it seems strange to report that some of the site is to see its cleaning regime reduced from daily to weekly.

From now staff working in the administrative section at Heath Road will find their offices only cleaned once a week and they have been asked to take rubbish home with them.

It seems extraordinary that in the 21st century managers at our state-of-the art hospital which is having a huge new extension being built are faced with having to decide whether to clean wards or their own offices.

That is a terrible indictment of the state of the NHS today.


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Of course if it is really a choice between cleaning wards and cleaning offices, then the wards must always come first.

But really a culture of cleanliness needs to be introduced right across the hospital - in every department from the operating theatres to the chief executive's office.

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Will staff be able to catch every crumb from their sandwiches, every splash of juice from their lunchtime apples.

It is these that can be the breeding ground for germs - and the prospect of them being left for a week anywhere on a hospital site is totally unacceptable.

JOHN Rednall's bowls career has taken him all over the world in 20 years of representing England, but the Needham Market teacher remains committed to the sport at the grassroots as well as the international arena.

This unassuming sporting hero is currently hoping to represent his country in the world championships in New Zealand early next year.

But he continues to work with young players in Suffolk, coaching at Rushmere Road and helping an estimated 150 children to get their first taste of life on the bowls green over the last few years.

WHEN London won the right to hold the Olympics in 2012, the whole nation celebrated.

But now the organisers have shocked the world by coming up with a farcical logo that again seems to have united the country - in cries of derision.

With all the great designers we have in Britain is this dreadful offering the best that they could have come up with?

All the amateur suggestions - including those from schoolchildren - are much better than this dreadful attempt which is already being treated as a laughing stock.

STEVIE Farrow suffers from a rare eye condition which has left him in almost total darkness - but he can see a few bright lights and shapes.

The dozens of fund-raisers who have raised thousands to create a light room for the two-year-old have literally lit up his life - and if you need proof of that just look at the pictures of his face in today's Evening Star!

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