Housebuilders lose another appeal

LUXURY housebuilders lost another appeal when an inspector ruled against their scheme to replace an empty industrial building with homes near Woodbridge waterfront.

LUXURY housebuilders lost another appeal when an inspector ruled against their scheme to replace an empty industrial building with homes near Woodbridge waterfront.

Michael Howard Homes, of Dedham, was refused permission to replace Nunn's Mill, Quayside, Woodbridge, with two terraces of four three-storey houses. The company appealed against the Suffolk Coastal District Council's refusal and an inquiry was held in December with the inspector's adjudication being released yesterday.

The company has, within the space of a week, lost two major planning appeals in Woodbridge. An inspector ruled that the housing proposed for the Whisstock's boatyard was unacceptable and it would be out of place within the mixed industrial, commercial and recreational character of the area.

The latest decision said Michael Howard Homes had not produced evidence to back up claims that Nunn's Mill was unsuitable for a future industrial use.


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Government inspector Anthony Davison, said the empty building was relatively modern, appeared to be in good condition and it was capable of being opened again for employment.

Mr Davison said: "The appellants have failed to demonstrate there is an overriding need for housing in Woodbridge that would justify the loss of employment opportunity resulting from the appeal proposal."

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He said the Local Plan recognised that many people lived in Woodbridge but worked outside the town and it was important to resist the loss of job opportunities in the town.

Mr Davison supported the views of people living in Doric Place who were worried about the impact of one terrace of new homes on their property. He said the terrace would cause serious harm to the setting of the listed building at 11 Doric Place and the householders would find it severely oppressive and overbearing.

Mr Davison added: "The insensitive siting of one of the terraces in front of the adjoining listed building would harm the street scene. It would also, in my view, detract from the character and appearance of the conservation area."

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