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New hydrotherapy facility to help Suffolk dogs to recover

PUBLISHED: 11:30 27 February 2020

A new dog hydrotherapy facility has opened in Trimley St Mary to help dogs recuperate, hydrotherapist Vicky took her dog for a swim  Picture: CHARLOTTE BOND

A new dog hydrotherapy facility has opened in Trimley St Mary to help dogs recuperate, hydrotherapist Vicky took her dog for a swim Picture: CHARLOTTE BOND

Charlotte Bond

A new facility to help injured pets has opened at a Suffolk vets.

The new facilities at the clinic  Picture: CHARLOTTE BONDThe new facilities at the clinic Picture: CHARLOTTE BOND

The facility, known as the Maybridge Canine Hydrotherapy Clinic, has been opened at Whitworth Veterinary Practice in Trimley St Mary.

The practice of using hydrotherapy has become a popular way to help dogs recover from a range of conditions in recent years.

The new facility has been purpose built to help offer therapeutic treatments to canines and includes a pool space where the appointments take place.

Trained hydrotherapist Vicky Knight has been looking after dogs at the pool for the past few months and is excited to be working at the practice.

The new pool will help Suffolk dogs to recover from a range of conditions Picture: CHARLOTTE BONDThe new pool will help Suffolk dogs to recover from a range of conditions Picture: CHARLOTTE BOND

"It's a little but scary for some dogs," said Miss Knight.

"Every dog is different. Every dog I do completely differently.

"Our sessions are up to 45 minutes."

Much like their human counterparts, each dog is showered before entering the pool through a special ramp.

After that each session is tailored to whatever the canine patient needs whether it be more swimming for those who need to improve fitness levels or less intense work for those recovering from certain conditions.

Other conditions like arthritis and some spinal issues can also be treated using the pool.

Miss Knight said it was important that treatment was tailored and works to help the whole dog.

"It could be used for fitness or it be pre or post surgery," said Miss Knight.

"It comes from a referral from a vets."

The warm water helps less strain is placed on the dog's joints and can also help to build cardiovascular stamina.

As well as injured pooches, Miss Knight also provides services for dogs who compete professionally in agility competitions by giving them aquatic massages.

"I make sure they are fit and ready to compete," said Miss Knight.

In the future, Miss Knight said that the clinic may look to employ another hydrotherapist, one that may also work in physiotherapy as the work often compliments each other.

Despite the profession being an unusual one, Miss Knight says she enjoys helping dogs.

"It's nice to see the different breeds and behaviours," said Miss Knight.

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