Insect warning from experts

EXPERTS have warned that Britain's warmer climes and hazy summer sun are bringing European and Mediterranean insects which no longer die out from the cold.

EXPERTS have warned that Britain's warmer climes and hazy summer sun are bringing European and Mediterranean insects which no longer die out from the cold.

More butterflies is one thing – but more mosquitoes is quite another.

The government recently warned that the Asian tiger mosquito, which can carry the sometimes-fatal West Nile Virus, could be a new health threat in Britain. It has been found as close as Normandy, as well as in Italy, Belgium and Albania.

The mosquitoes travel in used tyres brought into Britain from the Far East for re-treading. The mosquitoes often lay their eggs in the water that collects in tyre treads. With our increasingly warm summers, these mosquitoes could survive in Britain.


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David Lampard, keeper of natural sciences at Ipswich Museum, said: "It is all to do with global warming. A lot of species that are usually found in Europe are spreading northwards.

"Mosquitoes get blown over from Holland and Europe anyway at this time of year. As it is warmer this year, these mosquitoes might survive.

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"This is what happened with the European wasp, which first started coming here in 1994 and is now established in large numbers."

Hot weather also brings more butterflies, dragonflies and moths.

Del Garwood aged six, was delighted to find evidence that wildlife was thriving in his Ipswich garden. The fat caterpillar he found turned out not to be unusual, according to wildlife experts at Ipswich Museum.

Mr Lampard said: "This is a good year for butterflies which, being cold-blooded, are dependent on warm weather to develop. In this hot weather, they are developing faster.

"We are also getting more migrant species from Europe, such as the Elephant Hawk-moth , which is doing very well at the moment."

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