Ipswich-born woman in The Apprentice

A BUSINESSWOMAN who contracted meningitis and was warned she might never lead an independent life is set to prove the doctors wrong and go up against television's toughest boss.

A BUSINESSWOMAN who contracted meningitis and was warned she might never lead an independent life is set to prove the doctors wrong and go up against television's toughest boss.

Ipswich-born Jenny Celerier will join 15 other contenders in a bid to impress Sir Alan Sugar in this year's series of hit show The Apprentice, which starts tonight on BBC1.

The 36-year-old sales manager will be hoping to follow in the footsteps of 2007 winner Simon Ambrose, whose grandfather owns businesses in Frinton-on-Sea.

The mother-of-one, who lives in Leicester but still has family in Ipswich, will be battling it out for a £100,000-a-year job in one of Sir Alan's companies.


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Along with the other hopefuls she will have to perform a range of tasks that will test her business acumen to the hilt.

Speaking in a video on the show's website Ms Celerier said: “I don't care whether Sir Alan is grumpy. I don't care if Sir Alan shouts, grunts or groans or anything. Essentially I deal with men who shout, groan and grunt every single day of the week.

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“You have to be ruthless. You can't take any prisoners. If you are sitting on the fence you are taking up too much space.

“I believe my underlying determination will be essentially a rocket propelled missile within the competition.”

She cheekily added: “Its absolutely vitally important for any woman operating in a men's business environment to understand the importance that a good pair of legs can have.”

Ms Celerier contracted meningitis in 2006 and doctors warned she would never live an independent life.

The show's website says: “2006 was a year of reappraisal for Jenny; she contracted meningitis and fought to contradict doctors who thought she would never sustain independent living again.”

The Apprentice starts tonight on BB1 at 9pm and will run for 12 weeks.

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