Ipswich: Hungry pup Jasper snacks on sewing pins

Jasper with vet Charles Bagnall

Jasper with vet Charles Bagnall - Credit: Archant

A mischievous puppy had a lucky escape after eating a snack that was bound to taste very sharp.

The x-ray of Jasper shows his sharp snack

The x-ray of Jasper shows his sharp snack - Credit: Archant

Three-month-old Airedale terrier Jasper was rushed to Orwell Vets Hospital at Grange Farm, Kesgrave after snatching the pins from a table at home, with his owners noticing a pin stuck between his teeth.

An x-ray revealed two pins in the puppy’s small intestine, but Jasper suffered no ill effects as they passed through his digestive system with no problems.

Vet Charles Bagnall, who initially x-rayed Jasper, said: “Jasper is a very fortunate puppy as the pins could have perforated his intestine and possibly caused serious internal damage.

“It’s fantastic news they passed through without us needing to operate particularly at his young age.”


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Jasper’s owners Jenny and Brian Roe said the puppy was a bit of a handful at the moment – like any young dog.

Mrs Roe said: “He’s into everything.

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“I saw he had got the tin tipped up on the table and there were pins in his hair. I opened his mouth and saw one between his teeth and gently managed to get it out but we didn’t know at that stage that he had swallowed any.

“We rang the vet and they said to take him in at once and they would do an x-ray.”

The pins were dress-making pins and each about one-and-a-half inches long.

She said: “They sedated him and kept him in overnight. We were so glad that they passed through him without problems – it could have been very nasty for him and meant a major operation.

“We are keeping a very close eye on him now!”

It is not the first unusual snack Orwell Vets have seen, having previously treated animals that had eaten a £10 note, peach stones, part of a TV remote, a whole leather lead and an oven glove.

Mr Bagnall added: “We therefore urge pet owners to remain vigilant as puppies and adult dogs are often curious and eat things they’re not meant to. Emergencies like this can all too easily occur.”

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