Ipswich: Kebab shop must pay nearly £9,000 after breaching hygiene regulations

The Great Kebab and Chicken House on Felixstowe Road.

The Great Kebab and Chicken House on Felixstowe Road. - Credit: Archant

An Ipswich kebab shop must pay nearly £9,000 after it admitted breaching six food hygiene regulations including breaching rules on cleanliness.

Doner kebabs placed on dirty cardboard in walk in freezer at Great Kebab House, Felixstowe Road

Doner kebabs placed on dirty cardboard in walk in freezer at Great Kebab House, Felixstowe Road - Credit: Archant

Roj Kebab Ltd, which trades as Great Kebab House in Felixstowe Road, was fined £1,000 for each of the breaches when its case came before the town’s South East Suffolk Magistrates Court.

An Ipswich Borough Council environmental health officer visited the premises near Levington Road on March 18.

During the hearing magistrates were told the officer found 30 contraventions of food hygiene legislation.

The company had previously scored 0 out of 5 for its food hygiene rating and had received a series of hygiene education visits by the officer prior to his inspection to explain the standards required of a food business.

Mecit Gilgil, a director of Roj Kebab Ltd, pleaded guilty to six regulation breaches including failing to keep the premises clean and failing to provide a suitably located wash basin which was designated for cleaning hands.

The takeaway also did not ensure items and equipment which came into contact with food were effectively cleaned.

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It had also failed to protect food from contamination which would have meant it could have been unfit to eat and may have had effects on someone’s health.

A further contravention of Food Safety and Hygiene (England) Regulations 2013 meant Roj Kebab Ltd had not stored wrapping materials in a way that they are not exposed to a risk of contamination.

The sixth offence related to the business failing to register itself with borough council.

In addition to the fines totalling £6,000 the company was ordered to pay court costs of £2,800.27. It was also told it must pay £100 to the victims’ fund.

After the case an Ipswich Borough Council spokesman said: “This company had fallen short of expected standards over a period of time. We offered support and training but we take food hygiene extremely seriously and in the end we felt we had to prosecute. We are grateful to the magistrates for recognising the seriousness of these offences.”