Ipswich teenager admits money laundering charge

Woman admits money laundering charge

Woman admits money laundering charge - Credit: PA

A teenager has admitted a money laundering charge after £1,600 of someone else’s money was put into her bank account.

Talia Bloomfield, of Trefoil Close, Ipswich, pleaded guilty when she appeared before the town’s magistrates’ court.

The 18-year-old committed the offence between November 6 and November 15, 2015.

Prosecutor David Bryant said there had been concern about Bloomfield’s welfare at the time and she was associated with older males from London.

Financial enquiries by police indicated there was unusual activity related to her bank account.


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An amount of £1,631.10 had been put into Bloomfield’s account. It was transferred from a Lloyds account held by a Philip Snowden,

Bloomfield was not working at the time and had been reliant on benefits. Before the money was put into her account she only had £1.41 in it, the court heard.

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On November 7, 2015, Bloomfield bought shoes from Office for £119.97. The following day she made a cash withdrawal of £300 from a post office near her home in Chantry.

Mr Bryant said Bloomfield told police Mr Snowden was a friend of her father and had put the money in her account for him. However, her father denied knowing Mr Snowden.

It was discovered Mr Snowden had £15,000 removed from his online ISA by fraudulent means and had reported it to Lloyds. He provided a statement to police confirming he did not know Bloomfield.

The court heard Bloomfield had a previous conviction for fraud by false representation.

Mark Thompson, mitigating, said his client did not realise the money had come from criminal activity.

She thought it may have come from her father.

District Judge Celia Dawson sentenced the mother-of-one to a 12-month community order, with a 20-day rehabilitation requirement and 40 hours of unpaid work.

She must also pay £85 costs and £85 to the victims’ fund.

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