Latest window museum display at Ipswich Waterfront features a knotty subject

The lattest window museum at Ipswich Watrerfront features displays from Des & Liz Pawson's collectio

The lattest window museum at Ipswich Watrerfront features displays from Des & Liz Pawson's collection. The Museum of Knots and Sailor's Ropework - Credit: Archant

Rope and knots can be considered the building blocks of civilisation.

The Ipswich Maritime Trust window wizards, who have put together tha latest Window Museum display at

The Ipswich Maritime Trust window wizards, who have put together tha latest Window Museum display at Ipswich Waterfront. This display features local knot expert Des Pawson's Museum of Knots and Sailors' Ropework - Credit: Ipswich Maritime Trust

We can see it in the maritime world - with ropes and knots vital for sailing and merchant ships from ancient times through to today, and leisure yachts.

The world relied on ocean going boats for international trade

The new Ipswich Maritime Trust window museum display, on Albion Quay, is a selection from Des and Liz Pawson’s Musuem of Knot’s and Sailor’s Ropework. They opened their museum in 1996 and their business is known as Footrope Knots.

Des is a world renowned expert on ropework and an author, and has advised for films and television programmes.

This window museum display is the 17th by the Ipswich Maritime Trust, highlighting the importance of its place on the River Orwell, for the development of the trading town.

Des Pawson said: “The pinnacle of the use of knots and rope can be seen in the work done by sailors, both practical and decorative.”

Most Read

The intention of their museum was to recognise the art and skills of ropework. Maritime towns, like Ipswich, would have Rope Walks were ropes were made for local ships and visiting vessels..

Their collection includes old and recent ropework, and ropemaking tools as well.

It brings together old tools of the rope and canvas working trades, so vital for sailing ships.

Des said: “it is hoped that by bringing together all these things, the world will better appreciate the history and skills used in creating such items which have not often been valued, exhibited or studied.”

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter