It's not the end of the world!

IF you're reading this, the world hasn't come to an end!The view over Landseer Park at 8.31am was comfortably similar to that of 8.29am and the people of Ipswich breathed a sigh of relief after what was billed as the greatest experiment in history passed without catastrophe.

IF you're reading this, the world hasn't come to an end!

The view over Landseer Park at 8.31am was comfortably similar to that of 8.29am and the people of Ipswich breathed a sigh of relief after what was billed as the greatest experiment in history passed without catastrophe.

Nobody slipped into a black hole and the universe didn't implode as the £5bn Large Hadron Collider experiment got underway, aiming to recreate the substance thought to have existed just milliseconds after the Big Bang.

Thankfully, experts did not bring about the end of existence as some people speculated.


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Two scientists in Hawaii even demanded that the Collider experiment be postponed until an improved safety report was produced but Professor Stephen Hawking reassured people that the chance of Armageddon was little more than non-existent.

Physicists hope that the experiment will tell them much more about the Big Bang and the nature of matter - even hoping that it could force them to reassess the whole subject over the next few years.

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Today is not the first time in recent years that theorists have contemplated the apocalypse, among them Leland Jensen who, 1987, predicted Halley's Comet would obliterate the Earth and all who walked upon it.

Sir Isaac Newton, like many, believed the world would end in 2000 and on Friday April 13 last year a hopeful punter walked into a bookies and put £10 on the world ending that day at 10,000/1.

It seems, at least for now, we're safe from total annihilation.

Peter Lockie, of Beatrice Avenue, Felixstowe, said: “I hope it produces something really interesting but I am concerned about all the expense.”

Basil Kemp, of Queensberry Road, Ipswich, said: “I think it's ridiculous - a complete waste of money. That money could have been spent on so many things we really need.”

Don Chilvers, of Oulton Road, Ipswich, said: “I never felt a thing - only the bus coming round the corner! They are only surmising there was a Big Bang so I don't know whether it's all really worth it.”

Paul Brown, 20, of Fletcher Road, Ipswich, said: “It's a load of rubbish. It might happen in a few billion years. If I see a ball of fire in the sky then I might start to worry.”

Emily Maguire, 17, of Bramford, said: “I wasn't worried at all. I was more worried about getting to work this morning!”

Charlotte Maguire, 17, of Bramford, said: “If I knew the world was coming to an end, I'd make sure I saw my family and then buy loads of stuff and not worry about running up loads of debt!”

Ed Darbyshire, 16, of Woodbridge, said: “I never thought it was going to happen. The experiment is just a big waste of money and they just shouldn't have bothered.”

Sam Hughes, 16, of Woodbridge, said: “I wouldn't be doing work experience if I thought the world was about to end. I'd take the £10 I've got in my pocket, buy myself a hot potato and abandon any plans I had.”

Ed Holmes, 16, of Woodbridge, said: “I bet they turned the machine on and nothing happened! I think the media dreamt it up because telling people the world will end is more interesting than telling them £5bn has been spent on a machine that goes in circles.”

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