Knife wound was accidental, court told

A 14-year-old boy accused of throwing a knife which became imbedded in the scull of a sixth form student told a court he had not deliberately thrown it at the youth.

A 14-year-old boy accused of throwing a knife which became imbedded in the scull of a sixth form student told a court he had not deliberately thrown it at the youth.

The defendant, who cannot be named, told a jury at Ipswich Crown Court yesterday that he had thrown the knife at a door to scare the boy after an argument.

He said he had not stopped to think that it might go through a gap in the open doorway and hit the boy.

"I was too angry and I didn't stop to think," he said.

He said when he realised the knife had hit the boy on the back of the head he had been shocked and upset and put his hands up to his face.

The court has heard that following the incident last September, the boy was seen by a psychiatrist who diagnosed him as suffering from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and prescribed medication for him.

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Asked by defence counsel Andrew Shaw if he had known he was ill, the boy replied "no".

The boy who lives in Ipswich has denied wounding the 17-year-old with intent to cause him grievous bodily harm and a less serious alternative charge of unlawfully wounding him.

It has been alleged the boy became angry after his mother refused to give him a lift to see some friends.

The boy became involved in an argument with the 17-year-old boy and they ended up having a physical fight.

Shortly afterwards the 14-year-old allegedly picked up a monkey wrench and hit the older boy causing a slight cut on his arm.

Within minutes the defendant, who was shouting "I'm going to get you and kill you", picked up a knife and allegedly threw it at the 17-year-old.

It hit him on the back of the head with such force that it became imbedded in his scull.

The knife penetrated the inside of the scull but had not caused any brain damage.

Psychiatrist Sandra Scott told the court the boy had probably been suffering from ADHD since he was five or six and had only been diagnosed following the alleged incident last September.

She said that ADHD was a mental illness and would have affected the boy's ability to act rationally when he was upset or angry.

The jury is expected to retire to consider its verdict today .

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