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Landguard's road the world forgot

PUBLISHED: 20:27 19 September 2002 | UPDATED: 12:40 03 March 2010

FAMILIES living in Felixstowe's "forgotten road" just want to keep up with the neighbours - and have a street that's safe for their children to use.

Youngsters have been injured on the path of dirt and rubble and broken concrete outside their homes, and mums and dads say it is one big hazard.

FAMILIES living in Felixstowe's "forgotten road" just want to keep up with the neighbours – and have a street that's safe for their children to use.

Youngsters have been injured on the path of dirt and rubble and broken concrete outside their homes, and mums and dads say it is one big hazard.

Just around the corner is the footpath and road they would love to have – brand new tarmac surfaces put down by county council contractors.

But the council can do nothing for the residents of tiny Landguard Road because it is a private street and repairs are the responsibility of its owner.

However, it is a case of the Landguard Road that time forgot as no-one seems to know who is the owner – and efforts to find them have so far drawn a blank.

The road's 13 houses – rented from Thompsons Estate Agents, Ipswich – have to put up with rocks and concrete sticking out of the walkway and children have fallen over and hurt themselves.

"All we have is rocks and concrete lumps, potholes and dirt, and drains which don't work – it's hardly a road at all," said resident Vikki Kane-Baxter.

"No-one wants to take responsibility. We understand that it is a private road but we don't know who it belongs to and what we should do.

"We have thought about raising money ourselves as a group of residents to do the work, but it would take forever and probably cost a small fortune.

"In the meantime, the children here have to face the continuous hazards outside their door – even walking along here is really quite dangerous."

Vikki, 17, a student, has lived with her mum and dad Jackie and Neil, and brother Jozef, 15, in the road all her life and says the state of it has just got worse over the years, and all the residents feel the same about it.

Suffolk Coastal council has stepped in to help the residents and Thompsons are obtaining quotes for the repair of surface drains.

But the council says while the houses were owned by millionaire Vic Thompson, who died last year, deeds show he did not own the land forming the path and road. Further research has also ruled out Trinity College, Cambridge, Anglian Water, the county council and the Ministry of Defence as owners.

The council is now trying to trace the original sellers of the land.

A Suffolk County Council spokeswoman said the authority was under no obligation to carry out works in privately-owned streets. If the road was brought up to an agreed standard by the owner, the council could adopt it and become responsible for repairs. It would be happy to advise residents on the issue, she added.

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