Livestock the highlight of Suffolk Show

TWO years on from Suffolk witnessing the UK's first outbreak of bluetongue disease exhibitors at the county's annual showcase are today proving that there is life in the livestock sector.

TWO years on from Suffolk witnessing the UK's first outbreak of bluetongue disease exhibitors at the county's annual showcase are today proving that there is life in the livestock sector.

Competitive livestock classes have always been an integral part of the Suffolk Show but, for the first time in several years, the cattle classes were oversubscribed and additional stalls had to be provided in a large marquee to accommodate the 500 or so entries.

An increase in the number of dairy breeds at the show has also resulted in the dairy cattle young handlers contest - in which the next generation of exhibitors have the chance to demonstrate their showing skills - being reintroduced after a five-year absence.

Sheep numbers are also well up on last year's total, with 435 pens having been booked. Two of the rarer breeds, the Norfolk Horn and the Southdown - which were crossed to produce the more commercially successful Suffolk breed - were particularly well represented, which the organisers put down to the Suffolk Show's strong reputation for the breeds.

The strength in numbers also extended to pigs with a total of 88 entries - similar to the higher numbers seen at the show in recent years - and goats with a total entry of 78.

Overall, there were nearly 400 livestock classes judged over the two days of the show, and that is not including horses.

Most Read

The 276 equine classes attracted more than 1,500 entries from across an even wider area, including many of the top names in showjumping.

This year's programme includes a new “horse and hound” competition, with showjumpers and agility dog handlers competing in pairs against the clock.

Light horses again accounted for the majority of entries but there were 153 heavy horses on view, including an increased number of Suffolk Punches - the historic breed which, together with the Suffolk Sheep and Red Poll cattle, completes the so-called “Suffolk Trinity” of livestock breeds, statues of which greet visitors at the main entrance to the Trinity Park showground.

Tell us your highlight of the Suffolk Show - write to Your Letters, Evening Star, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich, IP4 1AN or e-mail eveningstarletters@eveningstar.co.uk

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter