1,000 people respond to council fireworks consultation amid pet concerns

East Suffolk Council has launched a public consultation on whether to allow fireworks on public land.

East Suffolk Council has launched a public consultation on whether to allow fireworks on public land. - Credit: CHARLOTTE BOND/JAMES MALLINDER

More than 1,000 people have responded to an East Suffolk Council consultation on fireworks rules, amid concerns over animals and the environment. 

In March, local residents were invited to share their views on whether new measures should be introduced to protect east Suffolk’s communities, animals and environment. 

East Suffolk Council launched the survey to better understand how residents feel about firework displays that take place on council-owned land. 

Bosses say the noise associated with loud fireworks can cause a great deal of distress to some people as well as pets – especially dogs – farm animals and wildlife.   

They said fireworks also have impacts on the environment, with pollutants having the potential to contribute to air quality issues and falling debris can lead to unnecessary litter that can harm livestock and wildlife. 

When the survey launched, Cllr James Mallinder, cabinet member for the environment, said: “For many people fireworks are a fun and enjoyable way of marking significant occasions. However, fireworks can be a real concern for some people as well as pets, farm animals and wildlife.  

“This consultation is absolutely not about encouraging a wholesale ban on events of this kind, but acknowledging, as a council, that we have a responsibility to lead by example and consider the negative impacts that fireworks can have on people and animals. And this starts with events that we permit on our own land.” 

James Mallinder, Conservative cabinet member for the environment at East Suffolk Council. Picture: J

James Mallinder, Conservative cabinet member for the environment at East Suffolk Council - Credit: James Mallinder

A spokesman for East Suffolk Council said the consultation has been very popular among the residents so far.  

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He said: “We’ve had 1,050 responses so far, with a 100% completion rate for the online survey, which takes around two minutes to complete.” 

The council is encouraging people to have their say in the survey which runs until Friday, May 20. 

The RSPCA aims to change fireworks regulations in order to protect pets, wildlife and farm animals as they cause huge fear, distress and fatal injuries for all kinds of creatures. 

In its campaigns, the organisation encourages the public to stop firework displays or notify the neighbourhood in advance if a firework event is going to happen.