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Baby love spurs midwife Laura to run London Marathon

PUBLISHED: 06:00 08 March 2020

Laura at the end of one of her running events to prepare for the London Marathon. Picture: LAURA ASPINALL

Laura at the end of one of her running events to prepare for the London Marathon. Picture: LAURA ASPINALL

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Midwives see some of the very best and very worst moments of our lives and after spending years consoling devastated parents, an Ipswich woman is taking on the London Marathon to raise awareness for miscarriage.

Laura Aspinall and her five-year-old son Oliver. Picture: LAURA ASPINALLLaura Aspinall and her five-year-old son Oliver. Picture: LAURA ASPINALL

Laura Aspinall has spent eight years delivering babies in Ipswich Hospital but, as a staggering one in four pregnancies are estimated to end in miscarriage, some of her memories are painful.

After finding her passion for running she'll be taking on the famous sporting event to fundraise for Tommy's - a charity which researches miscarriages, stillbirths and premature babies.

"It's not that one particular case stood out to me it was more the sheer number of them I've seen," the 30-year-old explained.

"We see more than we should, we see it more often than anyone should. To go through that is so horrific for anyone.

Laura running at an event in preparation for the London Marathon. Picture: LAURA ASPINALLLaura running at an event in preparation for the London Marathon. Picture: LAURA ASPINALL

"People don't talk much about it, a lot of people use that as their coping mechanism - if they don't acknowledge it then it didn't happen.

"Sadly it happens a lot and it's important to have a support network for afterwards."

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As Laura works in the high risk unit she works with some of the most vulnerable mothers and says she has to be prepared for what she might have to face.

Laura Aspinall and her five-year-old son Oliver. Picture: LAURA ASPINALLLaura Aspinall and her five-year-old son Oliver. Picture: LAURA ASPINALL

She said: "It's absolutely draining and you have to be there to support them so you feel every step of the way.

"We experience the whole journey from the birth itself all the way through to doing the memories with them - where we make prints of the baby's hands and feet and take photos.

"Dads don't tend to open up but they're just as traumatised as the mums are - they suffer in the same way."

Tommy's has a research clinic in Manchester and also runs a rainbow clinic which supports families affected by these issues.

Laura's own experiences of motherhood have strengthened her compassion for her work and said she never thought that having children would change how she felt about it but added: "When you have your own it bring sit back to you that this could have been yours."

Her son Oliver is now five and she got back into fitness once she had given birth to him and her gym buddies convinced her to sign up for a 10K run.

"I always said I'd do a half marathon one day," she said. "My partner did the London Marathon and watching him do it I decided that I had to do it so signed up that night - I thought I'm in my running prime, I have to do it now."

To donate to Laura visit her Virgin Money Giving page here.

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