Lorry problems at Felixstowe seafront

LORRIES waiting to use depots on one of the main routes to Felixstowe seafront are claimed to be causing traffic danger.Highways chiefs said they had received a number of complaints from the public about the trucks and the hazards they are posing on Walton Avenue.

LORRIES waiting to use depots on one of the main routes to Felixstowe seafront are claimed to be causing traffic danger.

Highways chiefs said they had received a number of complaints from the public about the trucks and the hazards they are posing on Walton Avenue.

The road leads from the A14/Dock Gate One roundabout to Beach Station and is a popular route into the seafront, especially for visitors.

But drivers say the articulated lorries parked waiting on the carriageway to get into delivery depots are a nightmare to pass – leading motorists to face the possibility of a head-on collision with oncoming traffic.


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It is no better when the trucks pull up partly on the grass verge – and damage has been caused to the verges which the chamber of trade and commerce says is spoiling the attractiveness of the street.

Members of the joint county-town council Felixstowe Highways Advisory Committee considered a variety of options for solving the problems but decided the best one is too expensive – unless the depots are willing to help pay for it.

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It was agreed to defer the matter to the autumn and in the meantime see if companies were prepared to stump up half the cash.

The best solution was felt to be a lay-by in Walton Avenue outside the holiday park but this would cost £1,000 per metre, excluding design and construction supervision – meaning a minimum of £20,000 for one lorry space.

Highways officers from Suffolk County Council said this "could not be justified to resolve what in effect was a nuisance", and councillors felt it could also be seen as giving businesses which benefited an unfair trading advantage.

Other possible solutions included making the road a clearway which would prevent all stopping and parking on the road and verges.

However, police would be needed to enforce the order – and many drivers do not understand what a clearway is or the signs for it.

No waiting at any time was another possibility but would also need police action – lorry drivers caught waiting would just drive round and wait for officers to go.

The final option was more concrete bollards, but these were unsightly, and several already placed on the verges had been smashed by lorries and they would need constant replacing. They would also not stop the waiting.

Depots in the area said they had systems which required truckers to phone ahead to make sure there was a space for them in the yard. However, the problems arose because not all drivers did ring or arrived before the premises were open.

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