Loved ones pull together for Samantha

WHEN 34-year-old Samantha Russell was struck down by a huge brain haemorrhage a year ago doctors feared she would not survive.But today, after almost twelve months in hospital, she is on the slow road to recovery and beginning to think about returning home.

WHEN 34-year-old Samantha Russell was struck down by a huge brain haemorrhage a year ago doctors feared she would not survive.

But today, after almost twelve months in hospital, she is on the slow road to recovery and beginning to think about returning home.

Now friends and family are rallying round to raise the money needed to adapt her Felixstowe home so that she is finally able to leave hospital.

Before the haemorrhage, which is a bleed in the brain, on November 12 last year, Samantha displayed no warning signs or symptoms.

Her mum Lillian said: "We'd only just got back from a holiday in New York the day before. She went to work as normal the next day and the first I knew of anything being wrong was when I went to check on her in the evening and found her fitting on her bed."

Samantha was rushed to Addenbrookes where she spent the next month in intensive care and underwent major brain surgery.

Most Read

Mrs Russell said: "The doctors didn't think she would come out of it but she has done brilliantly and battled through so much. The staff there definitely saved her life."

She was transferred to Ipswich hospital at the beginning of December and has remained there since.

She has lost the use of both legs and her right arm and also suffers from short-term memory loss. Doctors are unsure whether she will ever fully recover but Mrs Russell is confident she will bounce back.

She said: "She has no problems with long-term memory, she knew who we all were, it is just the last few years that are a bit hazy for her.

"If I went out of the room and came back a few minutes later she would think it was the first time she'd seen me that day. But in the last few weeks we've been making progress and she's beginning to remember a bit more.

"She just can't wait to get out of hospital now and come home.

"We are fighting to get the house sorted for when she comes out and praying that it gets done before Christmas so that she can spend it at home with us."

Before Samantha can think about returning to live with her mum the house will have to be adapted to cope with her mobility problems.

Most of the money for the alterations will be provided by a disability living allowance but friends and family are fundraising for extra things that will help to make her life more comfortable – such as a reclining chair and extra physiotherapy sessions.

On Sunday, Samantha's friend and colleague, Emma Young, will run the Felixstowe half-marathon– with the backing of sponsors from across the world.

Miss Young, 23, said: "A lot of Sam's family are from Liverpool so we have people from up there sponsoring us and also people from Schenker's New York office who regularly spoke to Sam on the phone. I'm racing with my dad, Don, so he has lots of people sponsoring him too.

"I know I have already raised more than £320 here in the office so we're confident that we are going to make quite a bit.

She added: "I've never done anything like this before and I think it will be extremely hard but knowing that I am making a difference to Sam will be the incentive I need to keep going.

"Sam is a bright and bubbly girl and she's fought so hard, she will get there."

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter