Mail managers anxious Christmas

ROYAL MAIL managers in Suffolk were today sweating on their future after the company announced they would be cutting 3,000 jobs nationwide.However, the redundancies, aimed at reducing costs and improving efficiency, will not affect the postal delivery workers working in Suffolk or other employees in operational jobs.

ROYAL MAIL managers in Suffolk were today sweating on their future after the company announced they would be cutting 3,000 jobs nationwide.

However, the redundancies, aimed at reducing costs and improving efficiency, will not affect the postal delivery workers working in Suffolk or other employees in operational jobs.

A Royal Mail spokeswoman said the redundancies would not be on an area-by-area basis and would only affect non-operational managers such as those in marketing, public relations and advertising.

She stressed that volunteers for redundancy were sought but added that if not enough people volunteered then forced redundancies would then have to be implemented.

The jobs are expected to be lost by next March as part of 30,000 posts being cut in a three-year renewal programme. The Royal Mail had already cut around 14,500 jobs since the plan was launched 18 months ago.

Adam Crozier, Royal Mail's chief executive, said: "We are conducting a series of reviews of the non-operational parts of our business to strengthen further the focus on Royal Mail's commercial priorities.

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"Any job reductions we have to make are the hardest part of Royal Mail's three-year renewal plan. But there is no avoiding the harsh reality that Royal Mail must reduce its overheads and become more efficient to ensure a successful future."

The Royal Mail employs around 10,000 non-operational managers, but there are no figures available for only this region.

Peter Skyte, national secretary of the communication managers section of trade union Amicus, said: "This will be seen as a kick in the teeth for Royal Mail managers and a complete lack of recognition for their efforts in maintaining a public postal service during recent disruption."

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