Man was on killer's hit list

A FORMER workmate of Michael Harvey today spoke of his shock at being one of the aspiring serial killer's potential victims. Alan Ede, 71, from Northampton, was on a list of at least 13 people the 50-year-old had pinpointed in his plans to become a mass-murderer.

A FORMER workmate of Michael Harvey today spoke of his shock at being one of the aspiring serial killer's potential victims.

Alan Ede, 71, from Northampton, was on a list of at least 13 people the 50-year-old had pinpointed in his plans to become a mass-murderer.

The revelations were made during the sentencing hearing of Harvey, who pleaded guilty to murdering his uncle Ian Halls, of Tower Mill Road, Ipswich, and then cutting up his body.

Harvey is now serving a life sentence, with a recommendation he serves a minimum of 29 years.

Mr Ede, who was due to give evidence at Harvey's trial before he admitted the horrific crime, said: "I suppose I was rather surprised. It was something I couldn't understand.

"It had been 12 years since I'd last seen him. I was very surprised he had thought of me.

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"I was told by the police I had been included on the list and I gave them three statements.

"He didn't mix much and I wouldn't say people got on with him. I'm just relieved it's all over and the court took the right decision."

Mr Ede, who worked with Harvey for about 20 years in the architecture department of Northamptonshire County Council, fitted most of the criteria set down by Harvey.

The former surveyor had wanted to kill and take the identity of someone earning a salary of more than £25,000, who had paid off most of their mortgage and had few relatives.

Although Mr Ede was married, he was listed alongside Harvey's ex-neighbours, Tony Markham and his girlfriend Jennifer Galsworthy.

Colin Markham, Tony's brother, said Miss Galsworthy had inherited a large sum of money, while Tony was not in contact with his family, making them attractive targets for Harvey.

Mr Markham said: "We used to go round to his flat regularly and he used to say there was a strange bloke (Harvey) living next door, but we haven't heard from him for years.

"The last I heard, he was living in north Wales somewhere."

AN Ipswich solicitor who represented Michael Harvey today admitted it had been one of the most bizarre cases he had ever worked on.

Charles Riddleston, of Saunders, Goodin, Riddleston Solicitors, of Queen Street, said: "If there is such a thing as a run-of-the-mill murder, this wasn't one of them. The judge said this was an extremely difficult case to deal with. I think the same applies for the defence."

Mr Riddleston revealed the last minute change of heart from Harvey who, until the eve of his trial, had protested his innocence.

He said: "It came as a big surprise because we were ready for the trial. It was a sudden development."

Previously, in the defence statement served on October 29, Harvey had denied murder but admitted to cutting up Halls' body.

Mr Riddleston is now looking forward to returning to more everyday matters.

He said: "From a business perspective, we've been in the fortunate position of having three murder cases on the go at the same time, which has put us under some pressure.

"It creates problems in terms of covering all the angles. Now I expect I'll be back in magistrates' court quite a lot."

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