Medieval house to be refurbished

RESTORATION work could see a property dating from the Middle Ages fit to be lived in again.The medieval property near the dock area is being restored by the Ipswich Building Preservation Trust.

RESTORATION work could see a property dating from the Middle Ages fit to be lived in again.

The medieval property near the dock area is being restored by the Ipswich Building Preservation Trust.

The Trust is to carry out complete refurbishment on Trinity Lodge in Back Hamlet that will be turned into two three bedroom semi-detached houses with gardens.

Tom Gondris, of the Ipswich Building Preservation Trust, was thrilled with the project.


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"At a time when there is so much interest in the whole waterfront area, the Trust is delighted to be involved in the improvement of the hinterland," he said.

The core of the building dates back to the 16th century when it started life as a farmhouse set in the open country. It was extended in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

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However, the property went downhill in the last century when it was converted into three flats.

More recently it was used for storage.

The Trust's last project was the restoration of the award-winning Half Moon and Star at the corner of St Matthew's Street and Barrack Lane.

The earliest known name for Trinity Lodge and land is Walch or Wash Fenn, in 1735.

At that time the sixty acre estate extended across the valley towards Bishops Hill and up the valley, which is now Cavendish Street, to within 100 yards of Alan Road.

The house was called Walch Fenn in the early nineteenth century and in later years it was called Lower Hill House, to differentiate it from a near neighbour, Hill House (now Alexandra Park). It became Trinity Lodge in the late 19th century.

The land which originally formed part of the estate was nearly all sold in the early 19th century leaving the immediate surrounding garden and four acres to the south.

By 1880 this field was sold off to become brick works.

Research has traced the ownership of Trinity Lodge back to 1720 when it was owned by Thomas King, a London glazier. He sold it on to a local man, Walter Ray.

Between 1874 and 1895 was used as a rectory for the neighbouring Holy Trinity Church.

The planning application for the development is due to be considered in January, and Mr Gondris hoped conversion work would get underway in the spring.

Weblink: www.ipswich.gov.uk/services/conservation/ buildingpres.htm

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