Memorial walk was flipping marvellous

WOMEN have flip-flopped all over Felixstowe in memory of a much-loved toddler.

Rebecca Lefort

WOMEN have flip-flopped all over Felixstowe in memory of a much-loved toddler.

Harry Porter died ten years ago from a rare cancer, neuroblastoma, when he was just 22-months-old.

Since then his mum, Angela, and dad, Dean, of Victoria Street, Felixstowe, have raised thousands of pounds for the Neuroblastoma Society.


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On Saturday the latest fundraising effort saw dozens of ladies trek around the town in the uncomfortable footwear.

Mrs Porter, 43, said: “I still think about Harry a lot, especially as it is the tenth anniversary of when he died this year.

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“I don't think we'll ever stop raising money because there are other families going through what we did.

“We've done various events over the last ten years and raised a lot. We've done discos and most of them raised £1,000 each.

“My husband did the marathon and I did it two years ago too.

“The walk was great fun and we collected about £280 from donations as well as the money we'll get from sponsorship.”

Mrs Porter's sister-in-law, Sandra Porter, who helped arrange the walk around the town, said: “We stopped at pubs along the way to make if fun because if it's fun people are more likely to participate.

“People moan about walking in flip-flops and it is hard work; we all had blisters at the end.”

- Have you taken on a challenge for a good cause? Write to Your Letters, Evening Star, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich IP4 1AN or e-mail eveningstarletters@eveningstar.co.uk.

Fastfacts: Neuroblastoma

- A neuroblastoma is a malignant (cancerous) tumour which develops in the nerve cells of children.

- Less than 100 children develop neuroblastoma in the UK each year.

- It is most common in children under the age of five and is slightly more common in boys than girls.

- There is no known cause of neuroblastoma.

- There is no genetic tendency or increased risk for brothers or sisters of sufferers.

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