Motorcyclist's drinking binge

A DRINK drive motorcyclist who ploughed into a level crossing listed the staggering cocktail of drinks he consumed during an afternoon binge.Before smashing into the railway barriers at Claydon, 21-year-old Jason Rollins had downed four pints of cider, six pints of Stella Artois, three glasses of white wine and the best part of a bottle of whiskey.

A DRINK drive motorcyclist who ploughed into a level crossing listed the staggering cocktail of drinks he consumed during an afternoon binge.

Before smashing into the railway barriers at Claydon, 21-year-old Jason Rollins had downed four pints of cider, six pints of Stella Artois, three glasses of white wine and the best part of a bottle of whiskey.

But a breath test revealed six foot Rollins, from Red Brick Cottages, Creeting St Mary, was less than twice the legal drink drive limit.

Despite leaving the accident scene to go to a nearby pub where he drank a further double whiskey and glass of white wine, Rollins had 67 microgrammes of alcohol in 100 millilitres of breath when the legal limit is 35.

Rollins said separating from his girlfriend had led to the Sunday afternoon session on November 24.

When asked by magistrates at South East Suffolk Magistrates' court to explain his behaviour, Rollins showed little remorse.

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He said: "There's not much to say. I was drunk and I crashed my bike."

He later added: "I had split up from my girlfriend I went out for a drink and did a stupid thing."

In court Rollins pledged to sell his motorbike to pay his fine of £200.

He was disqualified from driving for 18 months and ordered to pay £55 costs.

Prosecutor Gareth Davies said: "Police were called to the accident at Claydon level crossing at 8.20pm on Sunday November 24.

"One side of the barriers on the Great Blakenham side were damaged to the extent of being snapped off.

"Ten minutes later Mr Rollins returned to the scene after walking a short distance from the pub."

Mr Davies praised Rollins, who admitted the offence and was not represented in court, for co-operating with police.

Speaking after the case, Mr Rollins said: "I felt very drunk when I got on my bike. It was a stupid thing to do.

"I was drinking for most of the day and most of the day before. I knew I was drunk but it seemed the automatic thing to do."

He expressed surprise that his breath test showed such a low reading.

"I suppose it is surprising really, but I didn't think about that at the time. I was in pain.

"My bike wasn't that badly damaged – it was me who hit the barrier. I remember hitting the barrier but apparently I swerved around another one as well but I can't remember that."

After "cleaning" himself up following his crash, Mr Rollins returned to the pub for a couple of drinks. When he left, police were at the scene.

He said: "I went over and picked up my bike and the policeman said 'why are you picking up the bike'. I said because it's mine and the policeman said 'we're you riding it then?' I said 'well what do you think?' I was covered in blood."

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