MP keeps up Luigi pressure

IPSWICH'S MP Chris Mole has today said he will be seeking assurances that lessons have been learnt from the murder of Ipswich baby Luigi Askew.Last week failings in the support provided to tragic tot Luigi were identified in an independent report into the circumstances leading up to the baby's murder by his violent father Duncan Mills.

IPSWICH'S MP Chris Mole has today said he will be seeking assurances that lessons have been learnt from the murder of Ipswich baby Luigi Askew.

Last week failings in the support provided to tragic tot Luigi were identified in an independent report into the circumstances leading up to the baby's murder by his violent father Duncan Mills.

Mills, who murdered the one-month-old baby on May 26 last year as well as battering the boy's mother Samantha Askew on the same day, is due to be sentenced for the crimes on June 6.

The report, compiled by the Suffolk Safeguarding Children Board, has led to a total of 33 recommendations for change being made at various organisations including social services and the NHS.

Ipswich MP Chris Mole told The Evening Star he will be studying the findings and wants to be reassured that any necessary changes are followed through.

He said: “These are always difficult cases in as much as child protection interventions are very intrusive and people find it very difficult when working in this area to get the balance between intervening early to provide protection and in other cases delving too far into people's private family lives.

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“If there were a very clear failure of existing agreed procedures to protect children in Ipswich and Suffolk then I would want to be assured all the agencies involved were learning lessons from such failure.”

“There have been a lot of public inquiries into child protection cases including the Victoria Climbie inquiry in which Lord Laming set out very clearly the way in which child protection should be working in terms of agencies working together.

“That is the sort of regime that should be in place in Suffolk.

“Local service managers, whether they be in the police or social care or the voluntary sector need to ensure they are following what I think is fairly strong guidance on how different agencies share information in to what are the best times to intervene in child care cases.”

Among the findings of the report, it emerged that technical failings meant information was not readily available that would have highlighted Mill's violent past to social workers and other health agencies who already suspected Miss Askew as being a victim of domestic violence.

Two other separate police incidents were not logged as being of a domestic nature.

Mills, 32, was convicted in 2002 for causing grievous bodily harm to a previous partner, the mother of his oldest child.

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