Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

max temp: 20°C

min temp: 14°C

Search

MS sufferer's agony after 'grass' seized

PUBLISHED: 15:33 10 September 2001 | UPDATED: 10:31 03 March 2010

MULTIPLE Sclerosis sufferer Sheryl Moorey has slammed the anonymous caller who "grassed" on her for growing cannabis which she used as a painkiller.

Police swooped on her Felixstowe home and removed the two plants she grew to provide joints which she smoked once a day to ease her excruciating condition and help her get a good night's sleep.

MULTIPLE Sclerosis sufferer Sheryl Moorey has slammed the anonymous caller who "grassed" on her for growing cannabis which she used as a painkiller.

Police swooped on her Felixstowe home and removed the two plants she grew to provide joints which she smoked once a day to ease her excruciating condition and help her get a good night's sleep.

Now she has a criminal record after officers gave her a caution for cultivating the drugs – but no vital painkillers for her torment because the plants will now be destroyed.

Miss Moorey, 39, is furious that someone anonymously tipped off the police, who had no choice but to enforce the law, and says the case highlights the debate over MS sufferers and how cannabis can help them.

"I just could not believe it when the police arrived at my door. I was gob-smacked. I had no idea it was about my cannabis plants – I didn't even twig – and had not even thought about them," she said.

"All of my neighbours know I suffer from MS and I know none of them would have told the police.

"I don't know how the person who did this can live with themselves – they cannot know me. I am just so angry about the stupid, ignorant person who has done this. It just seems malicious.

"I know I have broken the law and I have been naïve, but I am not a drug dealer, I don't have queues of kids coming to my door – the only reason I grow it is for my own personal use, for pain relief, to make my life more comfortable."

Miss Moorey, who lives with her partner Russ Abbott in Exeter Road, Walton, Felixstowe, discovered she had MS in April.

She suffers from spasticity in her right leg and it suffers shakes and tremors. She got the seeds, very mild cannabis, off the internet and had two five feet tall plants growing outside her French windows.

She smokes one joint as a muscle relaxant each night before bed in order to get to sleep.

"It just calms me down, eases the pain and helps me to get a good night's sleep. It is purely medicinal," she said.

Despite only being diagnosed a few months ago, she already has to rely on an electric wheelchair to get about.

"Now I haven't even got my painkiller. What right has this person to interfere in my life – and they haven't even got the guts to give their name," said Miss Moorey.

She said the police had no option but to act after they had received the call because possession and cultivation is against the law. They fingerprinted and photographed her, and then gave her a caution.

"The police were very nice and very understanding and I cannot praise them enough. They were just doing their job," she added.

MS is a disease which affects the central nervous system, affecting many parts of the brain and spinal cord, with varied and unpredictable symptoms.

It cannot be cured, but it can be managed, and there has been great debate in the past few years over some sufferers' use of pot to relieve their symptoms and their pain.

Cannabis derivatives are currently being tested on substantial numbers of people with MS and other neuropathic disorders as a result of sufferers' claims about smoking dope and recently a House of Lords select committee urged the medicines control agency to help speed up the process of licensing cannabis derivatives.

The MCA, however, has said it may require further tests on the toxicity of one of the cannabinoids – the chemicals derived from breaking down the whole plant.

WEBLINK: www.mssociety.org.uk

N

What are you views on cannabis? Should the drug be legalised for its medical benefits?

Have your say and write to Your Letters, Evening Star, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich, IP4 1AN or e-mail EveningStarLetters@ecng.co.uk

Factfile

nOne of the earliest record of cannabis use is from a compendium of medicines compiled by Chinese emperor Shen Nung in about 2727 BC.

nQueen Victoria reportedly used to take cannabis in a tincture form (dissolved in alcohol) to alleviate her period pains.

nCannabis is illegal in Britain and is a class B drug.

nCannabis is believed to have medicinal benefits for those suffering serious ailments including cancer, Aids, glaucoma and Mutlitple Sclerosis.

nCannabis can reduce the side effects of chemotherapy. The drugs used to treat cancer are among the most powerful and toxic chemicals used in medicine and produce unpleasant side effects such as days or weeks of vomiting and nausea. Cannabis is an antiemetic, a drug that relieves nausea and allows patients to eat and live normally.

nThere is evidence that cannabis may stimulate the appetites of Aids patients with wasting disease.

nIt can benefit patients suffering multiple sclerosis by stopping muscle spasms and reducing tremors.

nGlaucoma is one of the commonest causes of blindness and there is evidence to show cannabis is an effective treatment by reducing fluid pressure in the eye.

nCannabis has also been shown to relieve the pain of menstrual cramps and childbirth and useful in treating depression and other mood disorders while it is also claimed to be good for treating asthma, strokes, Parkinson's Disease, Alzheimer's Disease, alcoholism and insomnia.

NThe British Medical Association (BMA) believes only cannabinoids, part of the cannabis plant, should be used in medicine. These are the active ingredients. Crude cannabis contains many toxic ingredients.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Ipswich Star

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists