Murder jury hears of fibres link

A JURY was told today of the type of velvety jeans which could be the source of a significant amount of fibres linking Simon Hall to the Joan Albert murder crime scene.

A JURY was told today of the type of velvety jeans which could be the source of a significant amount of fibres linking Simon Hall to the Joan Albert murder crime scene.

The court heard how the type of material from which the black flock fibres came was from a cloth called "6699 black velour."

An account manager for a clothing firm described the cloth as a sort which would be "marketed predominantly for occasional but not for everyday use," Simon Spence, prosecuting, told the jury.

A buyer for menswear designer Ciro Citterio said that she bought four types of jeans: black diagonal twill, plain black velour and plain grey and black jeans embossed with pinstripe for it's eveningwear range. The number of jeans came to 10,882 pairs in total.


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Mr Spence told the jury how each individual pair could be tracked by computer according to it's design and style.

The court heard that nine different styles of jeans went on sale at Tesco's at the Copdock interchange at the end of 2001 and beginning of 2002. They also went on sale at other stores across East Anglia including Top Shop stores, Top Man stores and Miss Selfridge, Debenhams and Principles for Men across the region.

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Hall, 25, of Hill House Road, Ipswich, is accused of killing Mrs Albert in her home at Boydlands, Capel St Mary, her body was found on December 16, 2001. He denies murder.

The court heard yesterday how an "unprecedented number" of black fibres were found linking Hall's car and home address to the crime scene.

Yesterday the court heard that Hall allegedly told staff at electricity company 24seven that he had occasionally given the 79-year-old widow a lift home in his car because she had been a friend of his parents.

The jury heard how forensic experts carried out detailed examinations of Hall's Audi car during June last year while it was parked at 24seven's Ipswich-based premises.

At the time, Hall was working as a call advisor at the company and had left the vehicle in the car park because it had a flat tyre and no alternator.

Earlier the court heard forensic scientist Judith Cunnison give evidence about the fibres found in Hall's car, his home in Ipswich and Mrs Albert's house in Boydlands, Capel St Mary.

Mrs Cunnison said in excess of 1,000 were found during the inquiry. She said the black flock fibres from the houses and car were indistinguishable.

The trial continues.

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