Murder victim's partner sold stolen item

The partner of one of the women murdered by Steve Wright is today beginning drug rehabilitation after admitting selling stolen goods to undercover cops.

IPSWICH: The partner of one of the women murdered by Steve Wright is today beginning drug rehabilitation after admitting selling stolen goods to undercover cops.

Addict Jon Simpson, 29, pleaded to guilty to five charges of disposing of stolen goods when he appeared at South East Suffolk Magistrates' Court.

Simpson's partner Gemma Adams, 25, was one of five women murdered by Wright in late 2006.

In 2007, Simpson was banned from the borough of Ipswich for a year after assaulting a police officer who had worked on the inquiry into his girlfriend's killing.


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Wayne Ablett, prosecuting, said Simpson had sold a variety of items to undercover police officers at a “sting shop” they had set up in Norwich Road.

Between October 2008 and July 2009, Simpson flogged bottles of wine, clothing, boxes of perfume, a DVD player and a mobile phone.

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Simpson, who currently lives at Ipswich YMCA, visited the shop on five separate occasions and sold items to two undercover police officers.

Mark Holt, mitigating, said: “There is no suggestion that he stole the items first-hand but he was going to receive payment from the thief.

“He was the face of the operation - he was taking all the risks.”

Mr Holt said that Simpson had used Class A drugs since the age of 21 and had appeared in court on a “regular basis”.

But Mr Holt added: “He is trying to turn the corner. He is nearly 30 and admits he has not achieved much in those 30 years.

“It's not going to be an easy fix. But he is stable and would welcome rehabilitation treatment.”

District Judge Michael Hogarth said: “I can see that you are trying to change your life.

“These are old offences and to your credit you pleaded guilty and have been co-operative.”

Simpson was given a community penalty, suspended for 18 months, and ordered to attend drug rehabilitation treatment for six months.

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