Musician's radical guitar lessons

MUSICIAN Richard Deyn claims to have invented a radical new way of learning guitar - and says people are going from beginners to band members within weeks.

MUSICIAN Richard Deyn claims to have invented a radical new way of learning guitar - and says people are going from beginners to band members within weeks.

His students come from all over the world and he never meets them because they learn via the internet.

Mr Deyn said he has tested the system extensively over the past two years and claims a 100 per cent success rate in teaching even those who believed they could not learn to play how to play songs within days of starting the course.

“Many people who want to play guitar want to do just that - play,” said Mr Deyn, who lives with his wife Sara, a vocal coach, and their young son in Kirton.


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“They want immediate results, almost to pick it up and play it rather than going through weeks of tuition. They just want to play a song they love or heard on the radio, or write a song for their wife.

“I set out to see if there was a way of teaching people quickly and easily - to concentrate on the techniques they really needed, the basics, and cut out all the faff and musical techniques they don't need to know.

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“There is no learning scales and so on, it's all about learning songs, making it fun and enjoyable.”

Mr Deyn, has taught music, been a member of successful band Eugene Speed, and recorded several CDs over the past 16 years, and has recently worked with top UK band Koopa.

He tested his Easy Guitar Method on 20 people of different ages and backgrounds.

“The only qualification for joining the test was for people to say, 'If you can teach me, you can teach anyone!'. We had a 100pc success rate.”

The four-week course aims to teach more than 30 songs in 30 minutes a day, and includes sessions on understanding the guitar and amplifiers, and song-writing. It is done by downloading video, MP3s and documents.

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